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Hacker and Paul Pierson explained how political elites have enabled and propelled plutocracy. Like every other prospering democracy, the United States developed a mixed economy that channeled the spirit of capitalism into strong growth and healthy social development. In this bargain, government and business were as much partners as rivals.

Public investments in education, science, transportation, and technology laid the foundation for broadly based prosperity. Programs of economic security and progressive taxation provided a floor of protection and business focused on the pursuit of profit—and government addressed needs business could not.

The mixed economy was the most important social innovation of the twentieth century. It spread a previously unimaginable level of broad prosperity. It enabled steep increases in education, health, longevity, and economic security.

And yet, extraordinarily, it is anathema to many current economic and political elites. And as the advocates of anti-government free market fundamentalist have gained power, they are hell-bent on scrapping the instrument of nearly a century of unprecedented economic and social progress. In American Amnesia, Hacker and Pierson explain how—and why they must be stopped.

In this tale of grit and glamour, setbacks and comebacks, business and pop culture icon Tommy Hilfiger shares his extraordinary life story for the first time.

Few designers have stayed on top of changing trends the way Tommy Hilfiger has. Fewer still have left such an indelible mark on global culture. Since designing his first collection of "classics with a twist" three decades ago, Tommy Hilfiger has been synonymous with all-American style--but his destiny wasn't always so clear. Growing up one of nine children in a working-class family in Elmira, New York, Tommy suffered from dyslexia, flunked sophomore year of high school, and found himself constantly at odds with his father.

Nevertheless, this self-described dreamer had a vision and the relentless will to make it a reality. At eighteen he opened his own clothing store, parlaying his uncanny instinct for style into a budding career as a fashion designer. Through decades of triumph and turmoil, Tommy remained doggedly optimistic.

To this day, his approach to commerce is rooted in his positive view of the world. American Dreamer brims with anecdotes that cover Tommy's years as a club kid and scrappy entrepreneur in s New York as well as unique insights into the exclusive A-list personalities with whom he's collaborated and interacted, from Mick Jagger and David Bowie to Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein.

But this is more than just a fashion icon's memoir--it's a road map for building a brand, both professionally and personally. Tommy takes us behind the scenes of every decision--and every mistake--he's ever made, offering advice on leadership, business, team-building, and creativity. This is the story of a true American original, told for the first time in his own words, with honesty, humor, and the insatiable appetite for life and style that proves that sometimes you have to dream big to make it big.

Since then, year after year he has been ahead of the curve with his elegant and stylish looks. His creative energy has always been an inspiration to me. He's really himself in American Dreamer.

In American Dreamer Tommy shows how he has taken the rock stars and the preppy stripes and come up with a look--and a label--that are recognized globally as being quintessentially American, as well as a brand that constantly keeps time with pop music. American Dreamer shows how he has managed to be successful in business and done so with integrity. I have come to know Tommy, and every time we talk I learn something new about creating a successful business.

In American Dreamer you can feel his passion pour through everything he does: American Dreamer documents how, unlike any other designer, Tommy was able to tap into music, its subculture, and its influence on society, which propelled his fashion to be mainstream and global.

Franz Contribution by Call Number: A44 Library West, Forthcoming Order. What does it mean to be an American? What are American ideas and values? American Enterprise, the companion book to a major exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, aims to answer these questions about the American experience through an exploration of its economic and commercial history.

It argues that by looking at the intersection of capitalism and democracy, we can see where we as a nation have come from and where we might be going in the future.

Richly illustrated with images of objects from the museum's collections, American Enterprise includes an early Thomas Edison light bulb, a wheat thresher, a Barbie doll, a Google server, and many other goods and services that have shaped American culture.

Historical and contemporary advertisements are also featured, emphasizing the evolution of the relationship between producers and consumers over time. Interspersed in the historical narrative are essays from today's industry leaders-including Sheila Bair, Adam Davidson, Bill Ford, Sally Greenberg, Fisk Johnson, Hank Paulson, Richard Trumka, and Pat Woertz-that pose provocative questions about the state of contemporary American business and society.

American Enterprise is a multi-faceted survey of the nation's business heritage and corresponding social effects that is fundamental to an understanding of the lives of the American people, the history of the United States, and the nation's role in global affairs.

L49 Library West, On Order. Americans today face no shortage of threats to their financial well-being, such as job and retirement insecurity, health care costs, and spiraling college tuition. By their nature, the very arguments intended to mobilize individuals—asking them to devote money or time to politics—remind citizens of their economic fears and personal constraints, leading to undermobilization and nonparticipation.

Adam Seth Levine explains why the set of people who become politically active on financial insecurity issues is therefore quite narrow. When money is needed, only those who care about the issues but are not personally affected become involved.

When time is needed, participation is limited to those not personally affected or those who are personally affected but outside of the labor force with time to spare. The latter explains why it is relatively easy to mobilize retirees on topics that reflect personal financial concerns, such as Social Security and Medicare.

In general, however, when political representation requires a large group to make their case, economic insecurity threats are uniquely disadvantaged. Scrutinizing the foundations of political behavior, American Insecurity offers a new perspective on collective participation. The American Mortgage System: Crisis and Reform by by Susan M.

Wachter and Marvin M. U5 A Library West. Successful home ownership requires the availability of appropriate mortgage products. In the years leading up to the collapse of the housing market, home buyers frequently accepted mortgages that were not only wrong for them but catastrophic for the economy as a whole. When the housing market bubble burst, so did a cornerstone of the American dream for many families. Restoring the promise of this dream requires an unflinching inspection of lending institutions and the right tools to repair the structures that support solid home purchases.

Crisis and Reform focuses on the causes of the housing market collapse and proposes solutions to prevent another rash of foreclosures. It examines key elements of the mortgage meltdown and the influence of the Community Reinvestment Act, which is often blamed for the crisis.

They uncover how the government-sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac invested outside the housing market with disastrous results. The American Mortgage System offers solutions to the problems. This book is a sound investment for economists, urban planners, and all who shape public policy. G Library West.

Once an icon of American industry, railroads fell into a long decline beginning around the turn of the twentieth century. Overburdened with regulation and often displaced by barge traffic on government-maintained waterways, trucking on interstate highways, and jet aviation, railroads measured their misfortune in lost market share, abandoned track, bankruptcies, and unemployment.

Today, however, as Robert Gallamore and John Meyer demonstrate, rail transportation is reviving, rescued by new sources of traffic and advanced technology, as well as less onerous bureaucracy. In , Congress responded to the industry's plight by consolidating most passenger rail service nationwide into Amtrak. But private-sector freight service was left to succeed or fail on its own.

The renaissance in freight traffic began in with the Staggers Rail Act, which allowed railroad companies to contract with customers for services and granted freedom to set most rates based on market supply and demand. Railroads found new business hauling low-sulfur coal and grain long distances in redesigned freight cars, while double-stacked container cars moved a growing volume of both international and domestic goods. Today, trains have smaller crews, operate over better track, and are longer and heavier than ever before.

Near the end of the twentieth century, after several difficult but important mergers, privately owned railroads increased their investments in safe, energy-efficient, environmentally friendly freight transportation. American Railroads tells a riveting story about how this crucial U. America's Assembly Line by David E. N Library West. The assembly line was invented in and has been in continuous operation ever since. It is the most familiar form of mass production. Both praised as a boon to workers and condemned for exploiting them.

In America's Assembly Line, David Nye examines the industrial innovation that made the United States productive and wealthy in the twentieth century. The assembly line -- developed at the Ford Motor Company in for the mass production of Model Ts -- first created and then served an expanding mass market. It inspired fiction, paintings, photographs, comedy, cafeteria layouts, andcookie-cutter suburban housing. It also transformed industrial labor and provoked strikes and uniondrives.

By , Japan had reinvented the assembly line as a system of "leanmanufacturing"; American industry reluctantly adopted this new approach. Nye describes thisevolution and the new global landscape of increasingly automated factories, with fewer industrialjobs in America and questionable working conditions in developing countries.

A century after Ford'spioneering innovation, the assembly line continues to evolve toward more sustainablemanufacturing. Library West, On Order.

The tumultuous era and remarkable personalities that unexpectedly birthed the Federal Reserve, from renowned financial writer Roger Lowenstein Until the election of Woodrow Wilson the United States—alone among developed nations—lacked a central bank.

However, in the aftermath of a disastrous financial panic, Congress was persuaded—by a confluence of populist unrest, widespread mistrust of bankers, ideological divisions, and secretive lobbying—to approve the landmark Federal Reserve Act.

Writing in a rich and untapped historical vein, Roger Lowenstein—acclaimed financial journalist and bestselling author of When Genius Failed and The End of Wall Street—reveals the drama-filled, unlikely story of how America created the Federal Reserve, thereby taking its first steps onto the world stage as a global financial power.

Aldrich, the reigning power broker in the U. Weaving a slice of American politics together with a storied financial collapse and intrigue at the highest levels of Washington and Wall Street, Lowenstein delivers a gripping historical narrative. C3 N37 Library West.

The definitive life of Andrew Carnegie-one of American business's most iconic and elusive titans-by the bestselling author of Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. Celebrated historian David Nasaw, brings new life to the story of one of America's most famous and successful businessmen and philanthropistsin what will prove to be the biography of the season. With a trove of new material--unpublished chapters of Carnegie's Autobiography; personal letters between Carnegie and his future wife, Louise, and other family members; his prenuptial agreement; diaries of family and close friends; his applications for citizenship; his extensive correspondence with Henry Clay Frick; and dozens of private letters to and from presidents Grant, Cleveland, McKinley, Roosevelt, and British prime ministers Gladstone and Balfour, as well as friends Herbert Spencer, Matthew Arnold, and Mark Twain--Nasaw brilliantly plumbs the core of this facinating and complex man, deftly placing his life in cultural and political context as only a master storyteller can.

Akerlof and Robert J. P8 A Library West. The global financial crisis has made it painfully clear that powerful psychological forces are imperiling the wealth of nations today. From blind faith in ever-rising housing prices to plummeting confidence in capital markets, "animal spirits" are driving financial events worldwide. George Akerlof and Robert Shiller challenge the economic wisdom that got us into this mess, and put forward a bold new vision that will transform economics and restore prosperity.

They reassert the necessity of an active government role in economic policymaking by recovering the idea of animal spirits, a term John Maynard Keynes used to describe the gloom and despondence that led to the Great Depression and the changing psychology that accompanied recovery. Like Keynes, Akerlof and Shiller know that managing these animal spirits requires the steady hand of government. They detail the most pervasive effects of animal spirits in contemporary economic life and show how Reaganomics, Thatcherism, and the rational expectations revolution failed to account for them.

Animal Spiritsoffers a road map for reversing the financial misfortunes besetting us today. Read it and learn how leaders can channel animal spirits--the powerful forces of human psychology that are afoot in the world economy today. T Library West. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world. Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, and turmoil.

In Antifragile,Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better. The antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events.

How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives? The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems, and medicine. In addition to the street wisdom of Fat Tony of Brooklyn, the voices and recipes of ancient wisdom, from Roman, Greek, Semitic, and medieval sources, are loud and clear. Antifragileis a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world.

M Library West, On Order. Dubai's Burj Khalifa--the world's tallest building--looks nothing like Microsoft's Office Suite, and digital surround sound doesn't work like a citywide telecommunication grid. Yet these engineering feats have much in common. Applied Minds explores the unique visions and mental tools of engineers to reveal the enormous--and often understated--influence they wield in transforming problems into opportunities. An engineer himself, Guru Madhavan introduces a flexible intellectual tool kit called modular systems thinking as he explains the discipline's penchant for seeing structure where there is none.

The creations that result from this process express the engineer's answers to the fundamental questions of design: Through narratives and case studies spanning the brilliant history of engineering, Madhavan shows how the concepts of prototyping, efficiency, reliability, standards, optimization, and feedback are put to use in fields as diverse as transportation, retail, health care, and entertainment.

Equal parts personal, practical, and profound, Applied Minds charts a path to a future where we apply strategies borrowed from engineering to create useful and inspired solutions to our most pressing challenges. In this book, Simon Bowmaker offers a remarkable collection of conversations with leading economists about research in economics.

He has selected a broad sample of the great economists of our time, including people whose perspectives span most of the major subdivisions of economics research, from micro to macro, from theoretical to empirical, from rationalist to behavioralist.

This innovative volume contains 25 interviews with practicing economists, presenting insightful personal accounts into an often-misunderstood field. Contributors to this volume were asked to reflect on their own experience in economics research, including their methods of working, the process of scientific discovery and knowledge creation, and the challenges of successfully disseminating their work.

The unique and compelling interview format showcases each contributor's personal connection to his or her work, presenting a view of current economics research that is technical, comprehensive, and refreshingly human. Both students and current scholars in economics will find much to admire in this book's window into the inner workings of some of the brightest and best-known minds in the field. I94 Library West. Whether mundane or life-altering, these choices define us and shape our lives.

Sheena Iyengar asks the difficult questions about how and why we choose: Is the desire for choice innate or bound by culture?

Why do we sometimes choose against our best interests? How much control do we really have over what we choose? Sheena Iyengar's award-winning research reveals that the answers are surprising and profound. In our world of shifting political and cultural forces, technological revolution, and interconnected commerce, our decisions have far-reaching consequences.

C45 L45 e-book MyiLibrary. Your guide to becoming an explanation specialist. You've done the hard work. Your product or service works beautifully - but something is missing. People just don't see the big idea - and it's keeping you from being successful.

Your idea has an explanation problem. The Art of Explanation is for business people, educators and influencers who want to improve their explanation skills and start solving explanation problems.

Author Lee LeFever is the founder of Common Craft, a company known around the world for making complex ideas easy to understand through short animated videos. He is your guide to helping audiences fall in love with your ideas, products or services through better explanations in any medium. You will learn to: Learn explanation basics, what causes them to fail and how to diagnose explanation problems. Using simple elements, create an explanation strategy that builds confidence and motivates your audience.

Produce remarkable explanations with visuals and media. The Art of Explanation is your invitation to become an explanation specialist and see why explanation is now a fundamental skill for professionals. The Art of Negotiation: W49 Library West. A member of the world-renowned Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School introduces the powerful next-generation approach to negotiation.

For many years, two approaches to negotiation have prevailed: Michael Wheeler provides a dynamic alternative to one-size-fits-all strategies that don't match real world realities.

The Art of Negotiation shows how master negotiators thrive in the face of chaos and uncertainty. They understand negotiation as a process of exploration that demands ongoing learning, adapting, and influencing.

Their agility enables them to reach agreement when others would be stalemated. Michael Wheeler illuminates the improvisational nature of negotiation, drawing on his own research and his work with Program on Negotiation colleagues. He explains how the best practices of diplomats such as George J. Mitchell, dealmaker Bruce Wasserstein, and Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub apply to everyday transactions like selling a house, buying a car, or landing a new contract.

Wheeler also draws lessons on agility and creativity from fields like jazz, sports, theater, and even military science. The Art of Strategy: D Library West. Game theory means rigorous strategic thinking. Though parts of game theory involve simple common sense, much is counterintuitive, and it can only be mastered by developing a new way of seeing the world.

Using a diverse array of rich case studies—from pop culture, TV, movies, sports, politics, and history—the authors show how nearly every business and personal interaction has a game-theory component to it. Mastering game theory will make you more successful in business and life, and this lively book is the key to that mastery. The Ascent of Money: F47 Library West. Niall Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of finance, from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest upheavals.

To Christians, love of it is the root of all evil. To generals, it's the sinews of war. To revolutionaries, it's the chains of labor. But historian Ferguson shows that finance is in fact the foundation of human progress.

What's more, he reveals financial history as the essential backstory behind all history. Through Ferguson's expert lens, for example, the civilization of the Renaissance looks very different: The rise of the Dutch republic is reinterpreted as the triumph of the world's first modern bond market over insolvent Habsburg absolutism.

Yet the central lesson of financial history is that, sooner or later, every bubble bursts. If you think those are the things to focus on in building an investment portfolio, Andrew Ang has accumulated a body of research that will prove otherwise. In his new book Asset Management: A Systematic Approach to Factor Investing, Ang upends the conventional wisdom about asset allocation by showing that what matters aren't asset class labels but the bundles of overlapping risks they represent.

Making investments is like eating a healthy diet, Angsays: Failing to do so can lead to a serious case of malnutrition - for investors as well as diners. The key, in Ang's view, is bad times, and the fact that every investor's bad times are somewhat different.

The notion that bad times are paramount is the guiding principle of the book, which offers a new approach to the age-old problem of where do you put your money? Years of experience, both as afinance professor and as a consultant, have led Ang to see that the traditional approach, with its focus on asset classes, is too crude and ultimately too costly to serve investors adequately.

He focuses instead on "factor risks," the peculiar sets of hard times that cut across asset classes, andthat must be the focus of our attention if we are to weather market turmoil and receive the rewards that come with doing so.

Optimally harvesting factor premiums - on our own or by hiring others -r equires identifying your particular set of hard times, and exploiting the difference between them andthose of the average investor.

Clearly written yet chock-full of the latest research and data, Asset Management will be indispensable reading for trustees, professional money managers, smart private investors, and business students who want to understand the economics behind factor risk premiums, harvest them efficiently in theirportfolios, and embark on the search for true alpha. Economists make confident assertions in op-ed columns and on cable news-so why are their explanations often at odds with equally confident assertions from other economists?

And why are all economic predictions so rarely borne out? Harnessing his frustration with these contradictions, Jonathan Schlefer set out to investigate how economists arrive at their opinions. While economists cloak their views in the aura of science, what they actually do is make assumptions about the world, use those assumptions to build imaginary economies known as models , and from those models generate conclusions. Schlefer takes up current controversies such as income inequality and the financial crisis, for which he holds economists in large part accountable.

Although theorists won international acclaim for creating models that demonstrated the inherent instability of markets, ostensibly practical economists ignored those accepted theories and instead relied on their blind faith in the invisible hand of unregulated enterprise.

Schlefer explains how the politics of economics allowed them to do so. The Assumptions Economists Make renders the behavior of economists much more comprehensible, if not less irrational. W82 Library West, On Order. From Tim Wu, author of the award-winning The Master Switch a New Yorker and Fortune Book of the Year and who coined the term "net neutrality"--a revelatory, ambitious and urgent account of how the capture and re-sale of human attention became the defining industry of our time.

American business depends on it. In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of messaging, advertising enticements, branding, sponsored social media, and other efforts to harvest our attention. Few moments or spaces of our day remain uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times.

Tim Wu argues that this condition is not simply the byproduct of recent technological innovations but the result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention. Wu describes the revolts that have risen against the relentless siege of our awareness, from the remote control to the creation of public broadcasting to Apple's ad-blocking OS. We've become the consumers, the producers, and the content. We are selling ourselves to ourselves.

A devastating critique of ad tech as it stands today, transforming "don't be evil" into the surveillance business model in just a few short years. It connects the dots between the sale of advertising inventory in schools to the bizarre ecosystem of trackers, analyzers and machine-learning models that allow the things you look at on the web to look back at you This stuff is my daily beat, and I learned a lot from Attention Merchants.

Auctions by Timothy P. H83 Library West, On Order. Although it is among the oldest of market institutions, the auction is ubiquitous in today's economy, used for everything from government procurement to selling advertising on the Internet to course assignment at MIT's Sloan School. And yet beyond the small number of economists who specialize in the subject, few people understand how auctions really work. This concise, accessible, and engaging book explains both the theory and the practice of auctions.

It describes the main auction formats and pricing rules, develops a simple model to explain bidder behavior, and provides a range of real-world examples. The authors explain what constitutes an auction and how auctions can be modeled as games of asymmetric information -- that is, games in which some players know something that other players do not. They characterize behavior in these strategic situations and maintain a focus on the real world by illustrating their discussions with examples that include not just auctions held by eBay and Sotheby's, but those used by Google, the U.

Treasury, TaskRabbit, and charities. Readers will begin to understand how economists model auctions and how the rules of the auction shape bidder incentives. Something that ruins or spoils Mosquitoes are the bane of my existence! They just love me, and by "love" I mean ruin my summer! The closure of the hospital could not have been more baneful to the already strained community.

Morally low, mean, dishonorable, of little or no value, crude and unrefined, counterfeit His philanthropy was underlied by truly base motives—he not only craved the fawning publicity his donations brought, but he was actually funneling drug money through the Children's Defense Fund! The supposed "gold bricks" were really base metals covered in a very thin layer of real gold.

The low status of pidgin and Creole languages is generally a consequence of the fact that they have not been regarded as fully-fledged languages, but as corrupt and bastardized versions of some other language.

Howling in a deep way, like a dog or wolf The lonely dog bayed all night. The mob bayed for the so-called traitors to be put to death. And she looked at me with kind of beatific smile and said, 'Yes, it's his sense of noblesse oblige. In contrast, a more specialized group of stem cells found in the bone marrow generally begets blood cells and immune cells exclusively.

In other words, melted sea ice could beget massive sea level rise, thanks to a supposedly unconnected system. I begrudge every penny of taxpayers' cash going to athletes while people are forced to wait for hip operations or cancer treatment. He concentrated on the detached word "inferior" and belabored it with untiring fury.

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The data belie the accepted theory—either we've made a mistake, or we have an amazing new discovery on our hands! He can be belligerent and has not handled the pressure of international cricket as well as he might have done. We play football in all perturbed countries, not just where there are belligerent situations like Syria and Afghanistan. Cook admits England's players are bemused at the way Hot Spot has worked during the Ashes.

Doing good The billionaire had been a mean and stingy fellow, but after his death, his beneficent widow gave all his money to charity, even accompanying the donations with handwritten notes thanking the charities for all the good work they did. Fall into a state of ignorance; overtaken by darkness; Indeed, there's reason to hope that even the most benighted moral equivocators may come to realize that the message is the exact opposite of the one they've been preaching.

A pair of climbers were benighted in a storm at the top of Royal Arches without overnight gear. Harmless; favorable; kindly, gentle or beneficial; not cancerous He was relieved when the biopsy results came back, informing him that the growth was benign. He's a benign fellow. I'm sure having him assigned to your team at work will be perfectly pleasant, without changing the way you do things.

Personal inclination or tendency He had a pedantic bent—he was just naturally inclined to correct people's grammar and otherwise act like an imperious schoolmaster. Even a vow of silence couldn't dampen the nun's garrulous bent—even her prayers were verbose! Hurricane Katrina 'is giving our nation a glimpse of the climate chaos we are bequeathing our children.

The amounts of money that could be spent on air fares and hotels for grandstanding dignitaries may yet exceed Alfred Nobel's bequest. The possibilities are not an abstraction; we can envision the house or its contents damaged, destroyed, or stolen leaving us bereft.

The city's government has been beset by corruption cases over the years. Attack, overwhelm, crowd in on or surround The regiment was besieged by attackers on all sides and finally surrendered.

I cannot go out this weekend—I am besieged by homework! Group of birds or other animals that stay close together; any large group The bar owner cringed when a bevy of women in plastic tiaras came in—"Another drunken bachelorette party," he sighed. To fork into two branches or divide into two halves The medical student carefully bifurcated the cadaver brain, separating it precisely into right and left hemispheres.

The bifurcate tree stood tall, its two massive branches reaching for the sky. Constantly irritable and ready to bite somebody's head off; So if there are any splenetic motorists or bilious cyclists out there thinking of penning an angry letter to the Evening Press, listen up.

Apostasy, the act of changing religious affiliation, carries an automatic death sentence in Saudi Arabia, along with other crimes including blasphemy. He questioned why Congress would still target Southern states when widespread blatant racial discrimination had ended. Some blocks within yards of downtown boast new housing and neighborhood shops; others are bleak and desolate. How many times have we heard the supermarkets bleating on about 'it is customer demand' when challenged about their imports of meat, poultry, milk and other produce that they could have bought local?

Disease that kills plants rapidly, or any cause of decay or destruction noun ; ruin or cause to wither verb Many potato farmers have fallen into poverty as a result of blight killing their crops. Gang violence is a blight on our school system, causing innocent students to fear even attending classes. Violence has blighted our town. Joyous, merry; excessively carefree so as to ignore more important concerns Delighted about making the cheerleading team, she blithely skipped across the street without looking, and just narrowly avoided being hit by a bus.

Fake, fraudulent The back of this bodybuilding magazine is just full of ads for bogus products—this one promises inch biceps just from wearing magnetic armbands! Strengthen or support The general requested reinforcements to bolster the defensive line set up at the border. Many people use alcohol to bolster their confidence before approaching an attractive person in a bar.

Of speech or writing far too showy or dramatic than is appropriate; pretentious Professor Knutsen's friends joked that he became quite bombastic after a few drinks, once asking a woman in a bar, "Is your daddy an aesthete? Because you are the epitome of ineffable pulchritude. Friendliness, open and simple good heartedness; By the end of the summer, the campers were overflowing with bonhomie, vowing to remain Facebook friends forever. Rude, ill-mannered, or insensitive person; a peasant or country bumpkin Milton was such a boor that, when Jane brought him home to meet her parents, he laughed at their garden gnome and made fun of everyone's hairstyles in old family photos.

Chairman Mao Zedong banned the game in for being too bourgeois. Thiamine can help improve your memory and recall, increase muscle control, and increase muscle endurance during short bouts of intense activity. Shake, wave, or flourish, as a weapon The Renaissance Fair ended badly, with one drunken fellow brandishing a sword and refusing to leave the ladies' dressing tent. A brazen assault by Taliban militants on Tuesday cast doubt on attempts at peace talks.

Headgear of horse for controlling it; v to put a bridle on; to restrain, check, or control; Some-one please bridle this infamous brute, before it is too late! These symbols of solidarity circumscribe the Amish world and bridle the forces of assimilation.

Navi took a quick break from their brisk walk by leaning against one of the light poles. Papoulias said he had broached the reparations issue with German authorities when he was foreign minister in , without success. Suffer or tolerate; "You will do your homework every night before you go anywhere, you will do your chores, and you will be home by 9 p. I will brook no disobeying of these rules, young man!

Pertaining to shepherds; suggesting a peaceful and pleasant view of rural life; The play was set in a bucolic wonderland—while getting some shepherd's robes for the lead actor was no problem, the stagehands had a hard time bringing in a flock of sheep.

Something that shields, protects, absorbs shock, or cushions; During the colonial era, England wanted Georgia as a buffer between its original colonies and Spanish Florida. A railroad car has a buffer similar to a bumper on a car to absorb shock in case of contact with other cars. When Joel came out to his family, he used his mother as a buffer—he knew she would be supportive, so he allowed her to relay the news to everyone else, and to relay their responses back to him.

Government characterized by many bureaus and petty administrators or by excessive, seemingly meaningless requirements; Some nations have a worse reputation for bureaucracy than others—in order to get a visa, he had to file papers with four different agencies, wait for hours in three different waiting rooms, and, weeks later, follow up with some petty bureaucrat who complained that the original application should've been filed in triplicate.

Grow or flourish rapidly; put forth buds or shoots of a plant ; The dictator was concerned about the people's burgeoning discontent and redoubled his personal security. Spending an hour a day on vocabulary studies will soon cause your lexicon to burgeon. Polish, make smooth and lustrous; Mr.

Hoffenstotter replaced all of the rustic wood doorknobs with newer models made of burnished steel. Support or encourage verb ; a support or prop esp. David used his Ph. Anything that is extremely intricate and complex negative connotation ; And because of a Byzantine system for handling receipts, it's difficult to track specific expenses.

Harsh, discordant, or meaningless mixture of sounds The first day of elementary school marching band practice was nothing but cacophony, as students who hadn't learned to play their instruments at all nevertheless banged on or puffed air into them. Ashton played a critical role, pushing both sides to cast aside envoys in favor of face-to-face talks and cajoling former sworn enemies to compromise. This team in particular was almost laughably callow.

Malicious lie intended to hurt someone's reputation; the act of telling such lies I've had enough of your calumnious accusations! Admit that you made up all those wicked things about me, or I will see you in court when I sue you for slander! Open, sincere, honest Allow me to be candid: You have been really secretive about where you've been going after work; we could use a little more candor in this relationship.

With scathing wit and bold candor, "Trouble in Mind" stakes out territory where few playwrights, today or nearly 50 years ago, have dared to tread. The canny acumen of business donors leads to inevitable speculation about the tax breaks linked to such donations.

Authorized, recognized; pertaining to the canon, or body of accepted rules, standards or artistic works School boards often start controversies when replacing canonical books in the curriculum with modern literature; while many people think students should read works more relevant to their lives, others point out that Moby Dick is part of the canon for a reason. A date is more fun with a little caprice—let's just start driving and see what we find! Mapmaking The invention of better navigation tools had major effects on cartography—the more ships knew precisely where they were sailing, the better the world could be mapped.

Criticize severely; punish in order to correct; At the grocery store, the mother attracted stares when she castigated—rather than merely admonished—her child for throwing a box of instant oatmeal. Causer of change The young manager was a catalyst at the stodgy old company—once he introduced employee laptops, telecommuting, and mobile workstations, even the most conventional of employees totally changed the way they worked.

Reaching pounds on the scale was a catalyst for Marcus to really change his lifestyle. Universal, broad-minded Some precursors to the Constitution such as documents governing the colonies enumerated the rights of male property holders only. Constitution took a more catholic approach, declaring that "All men are created equal. Capable of corroding metal or burning the skin; very critical or sarcastic Wait, those chemicals are caustic!

You need safety gloves and goggles before performing this experiment, or else you risk not only getting your skin burned off, but also some seriously caustic remarks from our chemistry teacher.

We'll add a caveat of our own for parents: After your kids walk through 17, gal. His winning number, "Raise the Kaffiyeh," was often played for Mr. Arafat and gave a spiritual boost to Fatah, only adding to Hamas's chagrin. Trickery, deception by knowingly false arguments The defense lawyer's strategy for getting her client acquitted by knowingly misinterpreting words in an obscure precedent was nothing but chicanery.

Nice try, passing off last week's homework as this week's by changing the date at the top. I've had enough of your chicanery, young man! You've made an alphabetical-order-line instead! He said that reducing the range to two hours would force Japanese airlines to fly more circuitous routes, burning up more fuel and cutting efficiency.

Strictly limit a role, range of activity, or area; in math, to be constructed around so as to touch as many points as possible; Suki's parent circumscribed her after-school activities; she was permitted only to study and to join organizations directly related to academic subjects. A square circumscribed in a circle has all four of its vertices on the circle's circumference.

Our land is circumscribed by hedges and fences. Cautious, prudent; careful to consider the circumstances and consequences; Luann immediately forked over an initiation fee to become a vitamin distributor, but her more circumspect brother had a list of at least 20 questions he wanted answered before he would consider joining. Climb awkwardly or with difficulty, scramble; The hiker had spent the last hour plodding lethargically up the side of the mountain, but when she caught sight of the summit, she excitedly began to clamber up even the steepest inclines.

The mayor couldn't even make herself heard over the clamor of the protestors. Make final or settle conclusively; to fasten or hold together; When their best player was benched, the team fell behind, but once he was allowed back in the game, the team was able to clinch the win. These two pieces have been clinched together with a clamp while the glue dries. Disgustingly or distastefully sweet; I do like visiting our grandmother, but I can't stand those cloying movies she watches—last time it was some heart-tugging story where an orphan saves a suffering pony.

I do like cake, but I find that honey-covered angel food cake positively cloying. Cause a liquid to become solid or semisolid; Hemophilia is a medical condition in which the blood doesn't coagulate, meaning that a hemophiliac can easily bleed to death from a small wound.

When making jam, use pectin to get the fruit to coagulate. Come together, unite, fuse together; While at first everyone on the team was jockeying for power and recognition, eventually, the group coalesced and everyone was happy to share credit for a job well-done. East and West Germany coalesced into a single country in Final part of a musical composition; an ending, esp.

Collins's conviction was overturned after he provided evidence that prosecutors had coerced testimony. Chest for storing valuables; financial resources, a treasury; The dishonest employee called it "dipping into the company coffers," but the arresting officer called it "embezzlement. Very convincing, logical; Studying logic is an excellent way to improve at formulating cogent arguments. Nurses who work in the Alzheimer's ward must develop skills for communicating with people who are often not cogent.

For example, they looked at cognates, words derived from ancestral words. Conspire; cooperate for illegal or fraudulent purposes; After two competing software companies doubled their prices on the same day, leaving consumers no lower-priced alternative, the federal government investigated the companies for collusion. Obama's speech in Tucson resonated because it harnessed an apparent national desire for more comity and civility in politics. In Washington these days, comity between Republicans and Democrats is rare.

The same in size, extent, etc. Concise but complete summary; a list or collection; I could hardly bring my whole collection of poetry books on vacation, so instead, I brought a lightweight poetry compendium containing a few selections each from 30 or so poets thought to represent various styles and eras. This movie review is unusually compendious—although a scant words, it tells every single thing that happens in the entire film.

Self-satisfied, smug; overly content and therefore lazy, neglectful, or some other bad quality The coach gave a pep talk: Eager to please; cheerfully complying; Coming from a more uptight corporate background, Chris found the soup kitchen volunteers remarkably complaisant—when he asked the greeters to sweep the floor and the cooks to wash dishes, everyone happily moved to their new positions. Completing; fitting together well; filling mutual needs; "That scarf really complements your outfit," said Elle.

The couple had complementary personalities—when Mark got overwhelmed with the details, Lee took care of everything, and when Lee got too introspective, Mark cheered him up with an insatiable zest for life. Obeying, submissive; following the requirements; Those who are not compliant with the regulations will be put on probation and possibly expelled. A compliant child, he never gave his parents any trouble. French prosecutors are separately investigating UBS France — and three executives — for complicity in illegal business dealings.

Reconciling, appeasing, attempting to make the peace The hotel manager was horrified at how the guest had been treated, and approached him in a conciliatory manner, offering him numerous freebies and apologizing repeatedly. When their crossing paths merged in glowing concords, the effect was magical. Approve, agree; John Locke wrote that justice is based on the social contract, and I concur—in fact, my latest book is all about contractual justice. Overlook, tolerate, regard as harmless; While underage drinking is illegal, at many universities, it is tacitly condoned by administrations that neglect to enforce antidrinking policies.

Consult, compare views, bestow or give; A Ph. Just as a combination of meteorological forces made for a particularly harsh storm, sports was spared Monday by a confluence of elements. Confuse, frustrate; mix up or make worse; He was positively confounded by a map that seemed to show "East Bethlehem" as being to the west of "West Bethlehem.

Mansour on several occasions, described him as pleasant, smiling and congenial, but very reserved. Over the remaining three hours, the scene became a congenial social gathering, the audience increasingly vociferous in its contributions. Suggest or imply in addition to the precise, literal meaning; The word "titanic" simply means large or majestic, but because of the word's association with the sunken ship, "titanic" has a negative connotation to many people.

Lesson the suffering or grief of verb ; a control panel, or small table or cabinet noun I was unable to console Tina after she fell asleep at the console of her airplane and thereby failed her pilot's exam.

Unite, combine, solidify, make coherent; She consolidated her student loans so she would only have to make one payment per month. As group leader, Muriel will consolidate all of our research into a single report. Tourism is now allowed in North Korea, but tourists must stay with official tour groups, and their movements are heavily constricted. Interpret or translate; I don't know how you construed my comment as an insult. All I said was, "Wow, I never knew you could sing. Place in context, such as giving the background or circumstances; Virginia Woolf's feminism is hard to truly understand unless contextualized within the mores of the highly restrained, upper-class English society of her time.

Remorseful; feeling sorry for one's offenses or sins; He would have punished his son more severely for breaking his car's windshield in a "rock throwing contest," but the boy seemed truly contrite. Rebellious; stubbornly disobedient; The psychologist's book Dealing With Your Contumacious Teenager would have sold many more copies to parents of rude and rebellious youth if only people knew what contumacious meant.

You're never going to please everybody, but my feeling is there seems to have been less contumely than might have been expected, because we have taken people with us.

Riddle, the answer to which involves a play on words; any mystery; A classic conundrum is "What's black and white and red all over? How to count the entire population accurately—including those without fixed addresses—is a bit of a conundrum. Move towards one another or towards a point; unite; I know we're driving to the wedding from different states, but our routes ought to converge when each of us hits I—maybe we could converge at a Cracker Barrel for lunch!

Call together, as to a meeting; The dean has convoked this gathering to discuss the Honor Code. To get from the hotel room to the pool requires following a convoluted path up two staircases and down two others—to get to someplace on the same floor we started on! The fertile, copious land yielded a rich harvest.

Could I first of all say a very warm and cordial welcome to you, Mr Justham, and indeed to your colleagues. I have a hard time believing that—is there anyone who can corroborate your story?

Belonging to the entire world, at home globally; free from local or national prejudices or attachments Trapped in a small town, he dreamed of a more cosmopolitan existence filled with world travel, exotic cuisine, and scintillating parties where he would meet famous authors and other cosmopolites.

Treat as a pet, pamper; The cosseted toddler was lovingly wrapped up in his snow gear, so much so that he could barely even move his arms enough to make his first snowball.

Close or exclusive group, clique; The pop star never traveled anywhere without a coterie of assistants and managers. Against what one would intuitively expect; Although it seems counterintuitive, for some extreme dieters, eating more can actually help them to lose weight, since the body is reassured that it is not facing a period of prolonged starvation.

Contrasting item, opposite; a complement; the use of contrast or interplay in a work of art; The play's lighthearted, witty narrator provides a welcome counterpoint to the seriousness and grief expressed by the other characters.

The hot peppers work in counterpoint to an otherwise sweet dish. Secret, veiled, undercover The soldier trained to be part of covert operations, moving silently and remaining out of the enemy's sight. Of Western countries, the United States was the most coveted destination, and that made Americans as desirable as movie stars.

Cunning, skillful in deception or underhanded schemes; A crafty play in basketball is the "head-fake"—moving the head in one direction slightly prior to running in the other direction, to try to get a tiny head start on a disoriented pursuer. Very Cowardly, lacking courage; The nervous soldier feared he would turn craven in his first firefight, but he actually acted quite bravely. Believability, trustworthiness; Many famous "experts" with "Dr.

Any television "doctor" who turns out to have a Ph. Gullible; prone to believing or trusting too easily or without enough evidence "Did you know you can wash your ears by turning your head on its side in the shower and letting the water run straight through your head? Steady increase in force, intensity, or the loudness of a musical passage; a climactic moment or peak Mrs. Higgins did love the symphony, but she was also coming down with a migraine—by the time the music reached its towering crescendo, her head was pounding.

The administration tried to ignore the protest, but finally had to address the issue when the demonstration reached a crescendo. He cringed away from Arun, eyes wide, then blinked and appeared to recognize the trapper. All that's needed is the support of a few like-minded political cronies and hey presto! Greed, great or excessive desire; The doctor's medical license was revoked after it was discovered that, out of sheer cupidity, he had diagnosed people with illnesses they didn't have and pocketed insurance money for performing procedures they didn't need.

Bad-tempered, difficult person; grouch; The college students' party was hampered by constant complaints from a curmudgeonly neighbor who insisted that making noise after 8pm was unreasonable, and called the police over a single beer can on his lawn. Based on my cursory observation, there is nothing but house building going on, so who is kidding whom? Because direct taxes will not rise, any shortfall will be clawed back through cutbacks.

Thinking the worst of others' motivations; bitterly pessimistic; Shilpa was so cynical that even when her friends threw her a surprise party, she figured that they only did it so they wouldn't feel so guilty about all the mean things they must be saying behind her back.

At small literary reunions he is the cynosure of all eyes. Wicked and cruel; The debt recovery agency that carried out the dastardly deed is not expected to have its contract renewed. Can they be so dastardly and despicable as to attack the president during a presidential campaign?

Discourage, dishearten, lesson the courage of; Amazingly undaunted after his accident, Devon vowed to complete a marathon in his wheelchair. Not even a dented rim on mile 19 could daunt him—he dauntlessly completed the race anyway. Degrade; lower in quality, value, rank, etc. Members of the mainstream church argued that the fringe sect was practicing a debased version of the religion, twisting around its precepts and missing the point. I can tell from the weight that this isn't pure gold, but rather some debased mixed metal.

Even as the debilitating recession slashed household budgets, the adult toy industry grew in size as consumers spent more time at home. More often than not, Michael Douglas is known for playing suave, debonair men. Expose, ridicule, or disprove false or exaggerated claims; Galileo spent his last years under house arrest for debunking the widely held idea that the Sun revolved around the Earth. The show MythBusters debunks pseudoscientific claims.

Speak in an impassioned, pompous, or oratorical manner; give a formal speech; After a drink or two, Gabe will declaim all night about campaign finance reform—you won't be able get a word in edgewise in between all his grandstanding and "expertise. Downward slope; Not just any declivity can serve as a wheelchair ramp—I'm pretty sure this thing is too steep to pass regulations. Behaving with propriety and good taste; polite; Miss Etiquette writes an advice column about decorum.

One writer asked, "What's the most decorous way to tell guests exactly what I want for my wedding? He decried it as an attack on the international working class, and encouraged all workers to refuse to go. Judge, consider; "You can take the black belt exam when I deem you ready, and not a moment before," said the karate instructor.

Vandalize, mar the appearance of; Ernest was charged with three counts of vandalism after being caught defacing a row of townhouses with spraypaint. Failure to act, neglect noun ; fail to fulfill an obligation, especially a financial one verb The government is cracking down on for-profit colleges where a large percentage of the graduates cannot use their degrees to gain employment and end up defaulting on their student loans.

You must elect a new health plan by December 31st or by default you will be re-enrolled in the plan you selected last year. The desertion of one's country or cause in favour of an opposing one; The costs of defection, for its weaker participants, would assuredly be higher than are the costs of continued compliance. The amnesty was offered after Ieng Sary led a mass defection of thousands of Khmer Rouge forces to the government. A single additional defection could mean losing a vote of no confidence, leading to early elections.

Respectful submission; yielding to the authority or opinion of another; In many cultures, young people are expected to show deference to older people at all times. I'm not an expert in databases—I'll defer to our programmers on that decision. Ingrid deferred her college admissions for a year so she could travel the world. For one fleeting moment the world has acted together in defiance of the group, whose isolation is now exposed for all to see.

Cause to curve; turn aside, esp. Every time he was asked a difficult question, Senator Warrington deflected by changing the topic, saying he'd answer later, or even—insincerely, it seemed—calling for a moment of prayer.

To help pay the cost of, either in part or full; Members were also reminded that a bring and buy sale would take place at the Federation meeting to help defray the cost of the bus to An Grianan. You can even charge for each note to defray the cost of providing this service.

According to this reading, the film is concerned with the extent to which the way we live is governed by machines - and cinema is one of them - that dehumanise our human transactions. He is the ultimate rage freak, glorying in the heat of his negative reviews while rarely deigning to actually consider the positive. Harmful, unheathful; The Resident Assistant told the first-year students, "I think you will find not only that drugs are illegal and will result in expulsion, but also that drug abuse will have a deleterious effect on anyone's grades.

Fix, mark, or define the boundaries of; The role of an executive coach is delimited by our code of conduct—we may not counsel people for psychological conditions, for instance. Mark the outline of; sketch; describe in detail; I do need the cash, but I'm not signing up for this psychological experiment unless you delineate what's going to happen. Leaflets published outside the country blamed the government, accusing it of being delinquent in carrying out its duties and criticizing the deployment of troops to suppress the uprising.

The use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, or anticholinesterase inhibitors for insomnia related to delirium or dementia is also unproved. A leader who lies and gains power by arousing the passions and especially prejudices of the people Political demagogues lie and twist the facts, depending more on their natural charisma and ability to determine exactly what their audience wants to hear than any actual understanding or perspicacity.

Both men are renowned for their friendly demeanour and reassuring manner. Show reluctance or object, especially for moral reasons When asked to name her favorite professor in the department, she demurred—she was pretty sure that, if she said anything, it would come back to haunt her. Belittle, attack the reputation of Many jokes in the Meet the Parents trilogy come from Robert De Niro's character denigrating Ben Stiller's character for being a male nurse.

Be a name or symbol for The company's brand denotes quality; the marketing team has done a fantastic job of associating the company's image with fine service. Mock, scoff at, laugh at contemptuously The manager really thought that deriding his employees as "stupid" or "lazy" would motivate them to work harder; instead, it motivated them to constantly hide his office supplies as an act of revenge.

Derived from something else; not original The singer's first album was a disappointment, derivative of several hit albums from the previous year, as though a management team had simply picked out the elements from other popular songs that they thought would make the most money. Thoroughly dried up, dehydrated The key to maintaining odor-free shoes is to desiccate the insole by placing a drying agent, such as a small pouch of baking soda, inside the shoe between wears. Lacking consistency or order, disconnected, sporadic; going off topic Lulu said she'd been studying for the GRE for a year, but she had been doing so in only the most desultory way—a few vocab words here and there, then nothing for a month, and practice tests whenever she felt like it, which was rarely.

Impartial, disinterested; unconcerned, distant, aloof He found her detached demeanor inappropriate for a funeral. It's fine to politely ask how someone died, but it's not appropriate to coldly question a relative on the medical history of the deceased.

Something that restrains or discourages Some argue that the death penalty is a deterrent to crime—that is, the point is not just to punish the guilty, but to frighten other prospective criminals. Very sheer, fine, translucent The wedding dress was a confection of diaphanous silk, made of at least ten layers of the thin fabric, each layer of which was so fine you could see through it.

Bitter, abusive attack or criticism; rant I'd stay out of the living room for a while—Grandpa's on another one of his diatribes about how it's un-American to call a large coffee a "venti. Division into two parts or into two contradictory groups There is a dichotomy in the sciences between theoretical or "pure" sciences such as physics and chemistry, and the life sciences, which often deal more with classifying than with theorizing.

Formal or authoritative pronouncement; saying or proverb "A stitch in time saves nine" is an old dictum meaning that it's easier to solve a problem before it gets too big. Intended to instruct; teaching, or teaching a moral lesson She might have been Teacher of the Year at work, but at home, her husband wished she would turn off her didactic personality.

Lacking confidence, shy Natasha was so diffident that she never believed her comments could be worth anything in class, even when she knew the answer. Spread widely, disseminate verb ; dispersed, widely spread out, or wordy and going off-topic adj The spy attempted to root out the dissenters at the gala, but he was only able to detect a diffuse sense of discontent all around the room.

Go off-topic when speaking or writing Grandpa digressed quite a bit while you were in the kitchen—he was telling us an old war story, but somehow now he's ranting about how nobody celebrates Arbor Day anymore.

That digression could take awhile. To become wider or make wider, cause to expand; to speak or write at length, elaborate upon The doctor gave her eye drops to make her pupils dilate. Slow, late; procrastinating or stalling for time Jack was supposed to start his presentation 10 minutes ago and he isn't even here? I'm not surprised—he's a dilatory fellow.

Person who takes up an art or activity for amusement only or in a superficial way The "arts center" in the rich neighborhood was populated by dilettantes—a sculpture here, a bit of music appreciation there, two weeks of painting class until they got bored and quit. Loud, confused noise, esp. A funeral or mourning song or poem It was supposed to be a wedding march, but when the organist started playing, the reluctant bride thought the song sounded more like a dirge for her former, carefree life.

Free someone from a mistake in thinking Do you really believe that toilets flush one way in the Northern hemisphere and another way in the Southern?

Any physicist would be happy to disabuse you of that silly notion. Having good judgement or insight; able to distinguish mentally In an age in which we are bombarded with advertising, it's important to be a discerning consumer. For instance, the term "all natural" is not federally regulated and doesn't have to mean anything at all, so a smart shopper still reads ingredients.

He hates telemarketers so much that he likes to discomfit them by asking them personal questions and suggesting he call them at their homes instead. Harsh or inharmonious in sound; disagreeing, incongruous In a graduation ceremony full of hopeful and congratulatory speeches, the salutatorian's address about the terrible economy struck a discordant note. Injure the reputation of, destroy credibility of or confidence in Congresswoman Huffman's opponent tried to use her friendship with a certain radical extremist to discredit her, even though the congresswoman hadn't seen this so-called extremist since sixth grade summer camp.

Difference or inconsistency When there is a discrepancy between a store's receipts and the amount of money in the register, the cashier's behavior is generally called into question. Separate, distinct, detached, existing as individual parts Be sure to use quotation marks and citations as appropriate in your paper in order to keep your ideas discrete from those of the experts you are quoting.

Judicious, discerning, having good judgment or insight He is a man of discriminating tastes—all his suits are handmade in Italy, and I once saw him send back an entree when he complained that black truffle oil had been substituted for white. The chef was astounded. Insincere, not genuine Christine used the fact that her mother spoke limited English as an opportunity to be disingenuous. When her mother asked, "Will there be boys at this sleepover? Unbiased, impartial; not interested Let's settle this argument once and for all!

We'll get a disinterested observer to judge who can sing the highest note! Disconnected, not coherent, jerky; having the joints separated The novel seemed disjointed, as though whole chunks of it were missing, or as though the author had tried to stitch together drafts of several different stories. Allow to disperse or leave; fire from a job; put aside or reject especially after only a brief consideration "Before I dismiss class," said the teacher, "I want to remind you of the importance of dismissing biases in your research by ruling out or adjusting for factors other than the variable you are testing that may have led to your results.

An ad hominem attack is a logical fallacy in which the arguer disparages his opponent rather than addressing the opponent's ideas. Belittle, put down; bring shame upon, discredit He chose the college for two disparate reasons: Unbiased, not having a selfish or personal motivation; calm, lacking emotion The defendant tearfully described how much her young child needed her at home, but the judge, who dispassionately sentenced her to 10 years for selling drugs, was unmoved. Speed, promptness; send off or deal with in a speedy way So, you want to be a bike messenger?

I need messengers who approach every delivery with alacrity, care, and dispatch—if the customers wanted their packages to arrive slowly, they'd use the post office. Scatter, spread widely, cause to vanish Because the demonstrators didn't have a permit, the police showed up with megaphones, demanding loudly that the crowd disperse.

A person;s general or natural mood; tendency She was possessed of a kind and helpful disposition—she wouldn't just help you move, she'd bring home-baked muffins to the affair. Disturbing, causing anxiety Mr. Peters' lack of emotion at his wife's death was disquieting—so much so, in fact, that even his own family began to suspect he'd had something to do with it. Mislead, conceal the truth, put on a false appearance of Roxanne was used to dissembling in job interviews; when asked about the gap on her resume from , she would say, "Oh, I was out of the workforce fulfilling some obligations"—a somewhat misleading way to describe a prison stint.

Scatter, spread about, broadcast Many plants use attractive fruits to disseminate their seeds—animals eat the fruit and excrete the seeds, allowing new plants to grow. Disagree or take an opposing view, esp. After the protests dissipated, Karachi Electricity Supply's next problem was making customers pay. Dissolving, the state of having been dissolved; breaking bonds or breaking up of a group of people; death, disintegration; sinking into extreme hedonism, vice, and degradation Raoul went from garden-variety hedonism to utter dissolution—his three-day drug benders cost him his job and may land him in jail.

Harsh, inharmonious sound; cacophony; disagreement After allowing her sixth-grader's heavy metal band to practice in her living room, Mrs. Rosen decided she'd better get used to dissonance. Swell, expand, stretch, bloat The emergency room doctor constantly saw people who came in with distended bellies, sure that they had appendicitis; usually, it was just gas.

Purify; extract the essential elements of While traveling in certain countries, it is important to only drink distilled water so you don't get sick. Act indecisively verb ; a state of fear or trembling excitement "Stop dithering," said the mother to her daughter. Occurring every day; happening in the daytime rather than at night While many Americans rarely have a sit-down family meal, in many other cultures, dining as a family is a diurnal affair. Differ, deviate; branch off or turn aside as from a path Go five miles until the old post office, then the road diverges—you want the branch that winds off to the left.

Deprive or strip of a rank, title, etc. Discover through divination or supernatural means; perceive by insight I've been poring over these quarterly reports all day, trying to divine whether I should buy or sell this stock. Person who applies doctrine in an impractical or rigid and close-minded way noun ; merely theoretical, impractical, or fanatical about other people accepting one's ideas adj The old science professor was so doctrinaire that he refused to even consider any evidence that flew in the face of his own research, and thereby failed to recognize when his graduate students made an exciting new discovery.

Support with evidence, cite sources in a detailed way, create documentary evidence of Journalists embedded with military units are able to document a war as it happens. Take off such as clothes , put aside; remove one's hat as a gesture Before the spring break revelers could consider doffing their clothes, they saw the sign: A system of principles laid down by an authority; established belief It is part of the dogma of modern education that there are multiple intelligences that are equally valuable; try to suggest that some people just aren't that smart, and you'll find yourself a pariah.

Asleep, inactive, on a break Some famous writers' skills have lain dormant until quite late in life; Laura Ingalls Wilder didn't publish Little House on the Prairie until she was Join or fit together When the neuroscientist married an exercise physiologist, neither thought they'd end up working together, but when Dr. Marion Ansel received a grant to study how exercise improves brain function and Dr.

Jim Ansel was assigned to her team, the two found that their careers dovetailed nicely. He drawled his name in a Southern accent. Funny in an odd way The play was a droll production—not laugh-out-loud hilarious, but funny especially because it was so strange. Who's ever seen a fairy be mistaken for a block of cheese? Person who is easily fooled or used noun ; to fool or exploit verb The dashing rogue used flattery and lies to dupe several old ladies out of their money.

Deceit, double-dealing, acting in two different ways for the purpose of deception The campaign worker's duplicity finally came to light when it was discovered that, despite rising to a trusted position within the local Workers Party, he was actually a registered National Party member and was feeding information back to his cronies. Grumpy, pessimistic, irritable; suffering from dyspepsia indigestion The dyspeptic professor was so angered by a question from a student who hadn't done the homework that he actually stomped out of class.

Very enthusiastic, lively, excited; bubbling as though being boiled The children were so ebullient upon their arrival at Disneyworld that their parents, while happy to see them so excited, wished that there were a way to forcibly restrain them in case they took off running towards the rides.

Peculiar, off, deviating from the norm esp. A level, rank or grade; the people at that level Obtaining a job on Wall Street doesn't guarantee access to the upper echelon of executives, where multimillion dollar bonuses are the norm. Selecting the best of everything or from many diverse sources Eclectic taste is helpful in being a DJ—crowds love to hear the latest hip-hop mixed with '80s classics and other unexpected genres of music.

The obscuring of one thing by another, such as the sun by the moon or a person by a more famous or talented person noun ; to obscure, darken, make less important verb During a solar eclipse, the moon eclipses the Sun.

Uplift, enlighten, instruct or improve in a spiritual or moral way Look, Son, I'm glad that you're reading, but I really wish you would read something more edifying than that magazine that gives tips for winning at violent video games.

He had a high and somewhat effeminate voice. The quality of being able to produce the intended effect Extensive trials will be necessary to determine whether the drug's efficacy outweighs the side effects. Representation or image of a person, esp. Jackson thought his daughter's boyfriend guilty of the worst effrontery when he asked for her hand in marriage—and, as soon as Mr. Jackson gave his blessing, followed up by asking for a job at Mr.

Related to the belief of the equality of all people, esp. Extraordinary or conspicuously bad; glaring Your conduct is an egregious violation of our Honor Code—not only did you steal your roommate's paper off his computer and turn it in as your own, you also sold his work to a plagiarism website so other cheaters could purchase it!

An exit or the action of exiting It is against the fire code to put those boxes there—you can't block a primary or secondary egress from the building.

Very happy, in high spirits I am elated that you flew my twin brother in from Australia to surprise me at my birthday party! Song or poem of sorrow, esp. Raise, lift up; lift the spirits of; move up to a higher rank or status or raise up to a higher spiritual or intellectual plane After a year getting coffee and making copies, he hoped to be promoted to a more elevated position suitable for a law school graduate.

Call forth, bring out, evoke The touchdown elicited wild cheers from the crowd. Someone who believes in rule by an elite group. Marked by forceful, fluid, apt speech; expressive, emotionally moving Wow, he's such an eloquent speaker, he could sell snow to Antarcticans!

Make abnormally thin, cause to physically waste away After 50 days floating on a raft at sea, he was quite emaciated—his family was elated that he was alive, but shocked to see a formerly pound man looking skeletal at just pounds. Decorate, add ornamentation; enhance a story with fictional or fanciful details Every time she tells that story, she embellishes it quite a bit—at first, she was lost in the woods, and then she was found.

The part with the grizzly bear was added later. To become caught up in a scandal. Prominent, distinguished, of high rank The undergraduate shocked everyone by asking the eminent old professor, "Really? What makes you such an expert?

Coming from, based on, or able to be verified by experience or experimentation; not purely based on theory The Ancient Greeks philosophized about the nature of matter concluding, for instance, that everything was made of earth, water, air, and fire without any empirical evidence—that is, the very idea of conducting experiments hadn't been invented yet.

Copy in an attempt to equal or be better than The ardent Star Trek fan emulated Captain Kirk in every way possible—his brash and confident leadership might have gotten him somewhere, but the women he tried to impress weren't so impressed. Warm, glowing praise, esp. Unfortunately, those doorways are precisely where building managers will want to stack sandbags to block encroaching water.

Native, local; natural, specific to, or confined to a particular place Certain diseases—especially those that require a precise mix of environmental conditions and local plant and animal life to thrive—remain endemic to particular regions. Weaken, tire After taking the SAT in the morning and playing in a soccer game in the afternoon, Trina was truly enervated before the prom even began.

In the late s, newly enfranchised African Americans began getting appointments as postmasters, clerks and letter carriers, said a report from the agency's historian. Produce, give rise to, cause to exist; procreate The television demagogue was blamed for engendering hate and divisiveness.

Raise to a higher value, desirability, etc. The cosmetics industry stays in business because so many people want to enhance their appearances. Puzzle, mystery, riddle; mysterious or contradictory person The enormous rock sculptures in Stonehenge are truly an enigma—were they created as part of a religious observance, or in deference to a great ruler?

We may never know. Having the right to certain privileges; believing, sometimes without cause, that one deserves or has the right to certain privileges Many bosses complain about young people's sense of entitlement—raised on a steady diet of praise from parents and teachers, these young people are shocked to be expected to "pay their dues" at a new job.

Count or list; specify one-by-one The Bill of Rights enumerates the basic rights held by every citizen of the United States. Lasting only a short time, fleeting "Thank you for this jacket that says 'Eugene's Girl,'" said Marie, "but I fear that your love will prove to be ephemeral—over the last two years, I've seen four other girls in school with the same jacket. Do you buy them in six-packs? Person with cultivated, refined tastes, esp.

Composure, evenness of mind; mental or emotional stability, esp. Use unclear language to deceive or avoid committing to a position Not wanting to lose supporters, the politician equivocated on the issue, tossing out buzzwords related to each side while also claiming more study was needed.

Wandering, not sticking to a circumscribed path.

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A perfectly cromulent episode to explain this seminal work to our future one-eyed alien overlords, " Fire" features Homer's lies of omission, Bart's rebellions, and Lisa's precocious intelligence. The family's working class status is truly defined when Homer loses his Mall Santa earnings on a racetrack greyhound named Santa's Little Helper.

After declaring that the dog is "a loser, he's pathetic," Homer's rage is broken when Santa's Little Helper licks his face, forcing him to admit: The only scripted TV show that came before the modern internet and is still running today, The Simpsons opened its second episode with two proto-memes. Bart's chalkboard gag has made us laugh and helped us mourn, while the family couch has seen everything from The Flintstones To Minecraft.

Bart, having cheated his way into being classified a genius, is transferred to a school for the gifted no, not Professor X's school. A great episode for Bart's pop culture moments, we get the first "Eat my Shorts," and Scrabble game-winner Kwyjibo.

Marvin Monroe, a family counsellor advertised during boxing matches. Unable to make progress through traditional means, the Simpsons try aversion therapy — leading them to cause a power overload throughout the city of Springfield by shocking each other repeatedly. As guaranteed, when Dr. Monroe gives up on the family, the money they initially the Simpsons paid is returned in double, allowing them to purchase an upgraded television - seemingly reuniting the family.

The episode is an early introduction to the dysfunction within the Simpsons family, a theme that will prevail throughout the series, leading to stories much more charming than this one - but, at least you get to see Marge drunk. Beginning without a proper intro,"Bart the General" is about how Bart Simpson must face Nelson, the stereotypical school bully.

The quirky jokes and relatable problems help remind me of how good cartoons used to be, and that is why I praise this episode. Following a small series of sad events, Lisa Simpson becomes depressed; she gives away her last cupcake, her band teacher tells her to follow the music, she is stolen from meeting a saxaphone-genius. It is unfortunate that The Simpsons has lost this feel, sucumbing to the humor of shows like Family Guy and South Park although I enjoy those.

Overall, a touching episode. The Call of the Simpsons is a product of its time: Watching Homer try to finance an RV was hilarious, and watching Maggie raised by a pack of considerate and intelligent bears will always elicit awwws, but the rest of the episode felt like a list of what could go wrong on a camping trip, ticked off one by one. Homer as Bigfoot never really landed. Albert Brooks appears, somewhat anonymously, as Cowboy Bob.

Bart, Jimbo, Kearney and Dolph stare at the sky and try to make out shapes in clouds. It's an apt metaphor for watching early Simpsons episodes. As the boys spot flaming school buses and a headless statue, so can one see the sparkles of genius that would come in later episodes. The majority of the episode is told in flashbacks: The entire town coming together as an angry mob over a desecrated statue: As a story, it's harmless and enjoyable. As a harbinger of future episodes, it's exciting.

I dare say that Life on the Fast Lane is the season's best episode. Not exactly a controversial view, considering it won an Emmy. I enjoy that it's a Marge-centric episode, and that it reveals more of her personality. Albert Brooks, in his second guest appearance, is hilarious as a French bowling master-cum-casanova, improvising most of his lines in a masterful performance.

It ends with Marge choosing Homer over Jacques, and a memorable Officer and a Gentleman parody that I remember seeing and not getting the reference as a child. Peak of the season. Homer Simpson is not a bad man. He is stupid, short-sighted, dense, and sometimes inconsiderate. But he is not a bad man.

Homer's Night Out is one of those classic examples of this. Despite Homer's hedonism, he knows that the right thing to do is to smooth things over with his wife and set the best example for his kids. And at the end of the day, that's exactly what he does, in classic Homer manner.

Even though the episode ends with a cheesy ending, it's a reminder that Homer will always be a good guy. A great episode that shows the charm of the first few seasons of the Simpsons. The writing in this episode is amazing showing Homer care for a child that actually seems to respect him. It's not one of the most memorable episode for a lot of people but it really does show the heart of the show. This episode really shows that the Simpsons writers can do when they take news stories or popular media and use it to push their plot along.

This episode had me laughing, and it was a great way to wake up. Funny jokes from cast like usual, it was a good episode. That is all you need to know about this episode. Here we get the first of a mostly annual side show bob treat when sideshow bob tries to take out someone from springfield. We also see the beginning of bart and lisa working together to solve a problem in the town, and this is a trope that the show will cary with it all the way to current seasons.

This is one of the most important episodes in the first few seasons that still effects the current shows being produced. Krusty being one of my favorite characters, I loved this episode because of him. The rest of the cast was good too, but Krusty really stood out in this episode.

In the season one finale, Homer is treating Marge to an extravagant night out while Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are left in the hands of what turns out to be the infamous Babysitter Bandit.

In its first season the show was still, like Maggie in this episode, learning to walk. Also like Maggie, they stumbled quite a bit. Plenty of throwaway gags just don't land, and the Homer and Marge plot feels superfluous and lazy compared to the hilarious, fast-paced antics between the kids and their babysitter-turned-robber.

Homer says the Simpsons are a "quite misunderstood and underrated family. Oh Bart Simpson, why do you not care? See what happens when you give things your best? The episode starts out with Homer freaking out with a new hair product on TV. It's a "Miracle Breakthrough. He gets it by charging it to Mr. Burns' insurance for the nuclear plant by lying.

It actually works, and he has a full set of hair. Homer then gets a haircut. Burns gives him a promotion, and he has to leave. Everything is going right for Homer as he has a better relationship with Marge, and Mr. Smithers is jealous, and finds out about the fake insurance claim.

Carl then covers for Homer, and gets fired. Homer loses his hair, due to Bart. Karl prepares a speech for Homer, but it fails due to Homer's lack of hair. Burns does not fire him, though, and demotes him to his old job. It's Halloween night in Springfield, and Bart is giving a story.

The family just moved in to a "cursed house" and strange things are happening in the house. They decide to "sleep on it". The house tells everyone that everyone is against each other, and they all get weapons. Marge stops it, and decides to leave with the kids. Everyone decides to talk to the house, and the house decides to destroy itself than live with the Simpsons. Aliens arrive, and abduct the family. They are greeted by aliens and eventually leave after playing games. Harry Shearer had not quite perfected Mr.

Burns voice yet - getting there but not yet. Animation was definitely unpolished. Character bodies are silly-putty looking compared to today's look. After Bart catches a 3-eyed fish and the nuclear plant Homer works at is threatened with a shutdown - Mr. Burns decides to run for governor instead of fixing the plant. Burns' comeuppance occurs when Marge serves him said 3-eyed fish for dinner the eve before the election. Homer, after getting drunk with Mr.

Burns, becomes a minor-league baseball mascot. And gets called "up". The atmosphere and slightly darker writing and almost film noir framing sequence is most excellent. The pop-culture references are spot on. The riffing of Lou Gehrig's speech right in the middle of all the ALS Challenges when this is airing in is almost chilling pun intended. But best of all — it has Dancin' freakin' Homer, man. A sensitive Homer starts a war with his neighbor Ned Flanders. This forces the kids, Bart and Scott, to make a miniature golf tournament into something much more.

Luckily for Bart, Lisa doing her best Mr. Miyagi impersonation , is able to train him in the ways of zen to help him empty his mind from the pressure that Homer brings. It also gives viewers the pop culture references that they have come to love from the Simpsons. All in all, "Dead Putting Society" is a great episode. His time on the street offers some potent social commentary on how poorly the homeless are treated mere seconds after receiving their holiday meal.

Once back home, Bart and Lisa are able to solidify their relationship. The scene on the roof helps clear up why they were having trouble in the first place. The family attend Lisa's music recital before dashing off to attend a one night only monster truck rally.

They drive right into the show where the dino truck crushes their car. Bart dreams of becoming the next big thing after seeing superstar daredevil Lance Murdock leap over a tank of water filled with deadly sharks and a lion? The next day, he attempts to jump a car with his skateboard and ends up getting stitches. After recovering Bart sets his sights on a real challenge: Homer meets him at the top and makes him promise not to jump, but ends up sliding down Bart's skateboard and falls down below.

Instead of Bart, it's now Homer sitting in a hospital bed next to Lance Murdock. Hey, at least Bart kept his promise? Maggie attacks Homer with a mallet. She resolves that cartoons must be the reason for violent behavior.

Marge writes a letter to the network only to be told to buzz off. Determined, she pickets outside the network. Marge appears on a talk show to debate execs and urges other parents to write in to the network. Under pressure, the cartoon is changed into a cheerful version of itself.

Other parents urge Marge to protest against Michelangelo's 'David' coming to town. She refuses, calling it a masterpiece. Pro-cartoon folks call her out, and she admits it's wrong to censors one art form but not another. Marge visits the statue, lamenting the lack of others there when Homer reminds her the kids are being forced to see it on a field trip.

Marge cheers up and seems hopeful for the future. By the end, this episode takes one of the darkest routes I could possible imagine for a Simpsons episode. The second you see Homer contemplating grabbing his drink you know how everything is going to end.

On a quest to try something new, the Simpsons go to a sushi restaurant. Homer being Homer, he falls in love with everything on the menu. The inept apprentice is left to cut the dangerous fish while the chef busies himself with Edna Krabappel. This episode is filled with a lot of fun moments such as Bart and Lisa singing the Shaft theme and Homer making amends with his father.

It also touches on an important life topic. Knocking goals of your bucket list. When the TV goes on the fritz we get our first ever Simpsons flashback. It's the story of Homer and Marge and may be one of the sweetest episodes the show has ever done.

We learn that they got married because Marge got knocked up but that is a story for another day. We meet lovable high school loser Homer with a thick head of hair. We meet a smart and engaged Marge who falls for Homers simple charms and sees that a kind man is more important than a smart one. We all melt when Homer invites her to the prom and she says that she will wear her hair up. When Homer decides to steal cable all is great until Lisa gets a terrifying lesson on Hell in Sunday school.

This episode is firmly in the oeuvre of Lisa being a giant stick in the mud. When everyone in town without a cable subscription gathers at the Simpsons to watch the big fight, Homer sees the toll it has taken on his family. Lisa losing respect for him, Bart charging the neighborhood kids to watch the adult channel and Marge concerned about both those developments. He joins them outside; "Dad we may have just saved your soul" says Lisa "At the worst possible time" replies Homer.

Homer reunites with his long-lost brother Herb and tries to support his failing car company. In a remix of the first episode in season 2 "Bart Gets an F", this time around the topic of failure is Santa's Little Helper. SLH destroys Homers new sneakers and even the Bouvier family quilt! There are no words. Homer and Marge want to give him away for his misbehavior, but luckily he eventually passes obedience class…and subsequently bites Bart.

This episode is a great reminder that although our pets may drive us insane from time to time, we could never imagine life without them. Grampa catches the love bug after mixing up prescription meds with the beautiful Beatrice Simmons. Ready to go big on her birthday, Abe ends up missing it stuck with the family at a safari overnight, surrounded by Zebra murdering lions and Beatrice passes away.

She leaves a large inheritance to him and he eventually decides to live the geriatric dream and increase the sum by gambling. Homer saves him from betting it all away and Grampa, looking to improve the lives of his friends, uses the cash to upgrade the Springfield retirement home. It's easy to look at the two plots in this episode and identify a theme: Marge and Homer both revisit their own lost causes. This wouldn't be interesting on it's own, but for the fact the main character is Marge, who has never enjoyed as much limelight as Homer, Bart, or Lisa.

This wasn't the best episode in season two, in fact, it immediately precedes it but it still has a several standout lines, and a great ending. The whole "Will you take us to Mt. Lombard, the overly complementary art teacher.

Watching this episode again took me back to a simpler time. When Simpsons episodes were about a blue collar family with relatable problems. The stories themselves are about nerds. Bart's political rival, Martin Prince, and Lisa and her temporary mentor, father figure, and unrequited crush, Mr. Clearly, Homer and Bart deserve each other.

They're able to spend quality time together in the B plot. In the A plot, Homer and Lisa drift apart. The conclusion is so poignant, I think, because Homer figures that out. He won't be able to challenge Lisa intellectually. He's neither smart nor charming. But he apologizes as best he can, because nothing is more important to him than his family. This episode covered a lot of bases for so early in the series for me. Tackling marriage problems, the kids taking advantage of grandpa, and had so many stylistic garnishes on certain scenes "So I said I must get out of these wet clothes and into a dry martini".

I also enjoy the classic touch of the penciled on beer stubble on Homer often utilized to present him as disheveled.

This episode starts strong but falls downhill, but that's bound to happen after one of the best rant's in the series "Yoooooou stink! You and your whole lousy operation stinks!! This episode was our first glimpse at 90s dance mogul Bartman who most people today probably don't remember and thus he still pays full price. The Wonder Years bit in this ep always puts a smile on my face. As with the episode before so many great stylistic cues with Comic Book Guy's maniacal laugh to the boys wrestling by the light of thunder and lightning in the treehouse they're fine.

I can only hope grown up versions of the boys are pooling their cash together and are bidding on the perfect Action Comics 1. Stingy as always, Burns gives only a simple Thank You card, sending Homer into indignant rage.

At its core this is an episode about synergetic relationships; both Homer and Burns rely upon morally stable characters Marge and Smithers, respectively to navigate important and difficult ethical decisions.

The episode, however, never feels heavy-handed, and is rich with some top-drawer moments: To top it off, Blood Feud ends with a classic bit of Simpsonian meta-fiction and moral untidiness: Just a bunch of stuff that happened! Persecuted as a "free-thinking anarchist" by Burns after a laundry accident, Homer is admitted to a mental institution, where he bunks with a patient who may or may not be Michael Jackson. The episode was initially steeped in mystery: The third act is a little undercooked, and the conclusion feels unsatisfying and tacked-on, but for the most part this episode stands up well to millennial scrutiny.

As the title suggest, this episode is primarily a satire on American politics and the political system. Though according to Wikipedia, the logging industry had an issue with this one.

As someone who is involved in the political scene, I thoroughly enjoyed this episode. A little girl is losing faith in democracy! The one where Ned Flanders opens a store specifically for left handed people. This episode really shows the complexity of the characters because even though Homer hates Ned, he still ends up helping Ned when Ned was in the dumps.

Especially that song at the end. Especially at 5am on Friday morning. But since the tightening precedes the evolution of the gag-saturated next years, the jokes neither jolt like in season 2 nor sweep you up in sustained wit like 7 and 8. Dry winners directly anticipate scene breaks or thudding resolutions. This episode, which tests the waters of emotionalizing Homer the "Project Bootsrap" power plant drone, is sharper and zippier, with never-fail Jon Lovitz, perfect-delivery Magic Johnson, and a slew of terrific moments "call me Mr.

We all knew by this time that Krusty was a troubled man, but in this episode we were introduced to another cause of Krusty's pain: The show actually credited two rabbis as technical advisers, which no doubt helped with the authenticity of Bart and Lisa's attempts to reunite the Krustofskys.

Although one is left wondering if the rabbis found the key Sammy Davis, Jr. Because the Talmud certainly didn't work. The first Treehouse of Horror was a classic, but the second one was a lesser effort. All of the stories are supposed to be scary dreams caused by excessive Halloween candy consumption.

But, all of them lack signature lines and scenes, which may be the scariest thing of all. There is a monkey's paw that grants wishes but only with grave misfortune, a parody of the "It's a Good Life" from the "Twilight Zone" with a few yuks, and finally the best part of the episode, watching Mr. Burns with Homer's brain on his head pretending to be Davy Crockett. Homer's hilarious naivete can occasionally be misleading.

But Lisa, being Springfield's most normal citizen evokes an emotional side of Homer when she puts him in a moral dilemma. She asks for a saxophone reed. But upon Homer's failure to fulfill her affordable request, he has to choose between working a second job at Apu's or tolerate the burden of a disappointed Lisa. He opts for the former. This is another fine display of family values and an early example of fast-paced humor that only Al Jean and Mike Reiss could have written for a animated sitcom.

A soapbox race becomes another daunting challenge for Homer. To make Bart happy, he should find a craftsmanship that is not surprisingly absent in his nature and will, halfway through the episode, lead to their embarrassment. But such an adventurous comeback from failure to success costs a densely written script that can eventually distract the viewer from the shore the story is supposed to reach.

This is an amalgam of motivation, despair, fatherhood and victory lust that can be digested with typical expected Simpsons wit outsmarting us using a roller coaster ride of events that could have easily derailed us otherwise. The episode opens with a wistful Mr. Burns reminiscing of childhood "I dreamed of grand slam home runs and wiping out nations with the stroke of a pen As the new German owners fire Homer in true German fashion in alphabetical order!

And lest we forget: Germans are not all smiles und sunshine. A pregnancy scare sends Homer on a Supertramp fueled flashback detour to the story of wooing Marge.

In an oddly sentimental outing, this Simpsons plays ping pong between sappy and comedy, with almost every "aww" moment immediately punctuated with a punchline from Homer. Its flashback nature also yields the classic scene where Homer ruins the twist of Empire Strikes Back while leaving the theater.

Like Homer says in this episode: Starting with a broken-on-the-spot promise made by Bart to not pull any pranks with the new AM radio microphone gifted to him by Homer, this episode follows his hijinks as they escalate in both deviousness and hilarity.

The resulting chaos delivers a near-perfect satire of news media, how we cope with tragedy, and Sting. Its swift, joke to joke precision is the way you would expect a classic Simpsons to flow, and it makes for an endlessly enjoyable watch. This Lisa-centric episode sees Lisa trying to connect with Homer by watching football with him and she has a knack for picking the winning team. Lisa has a terrible dream about what her future would be like if she kept on gambling. She denounces gambling, and asks him not to bet on the Superbowl.

Homer realizes that he needs to spend time with her outside of football. They go on a hike together the following Sunday.

I will not spank others. Marge is feeling under appreciated and overworked. She takes a spa vacation away by herself at Rancho Relaxo. Homer is inept caring for Maggie alone. Bart and Lisa go to spend time with Patty and Selma. The family is so thankful to have Marge back after the vacation, but Marge reminds them to be more appreciative of her in the future. I tend to think as time moves on a show starts degrading, but that can not be said about 'The Simpsons' rather than being a straightforward comedy series the show is filled with the kind of humor which basically coincides with our real world experiences.

I won't say that like how in this episode Bart faked writing love letters to his Teacher is what people do in the real world but c'mon Tinder.

The funniest part of the series was something to do with flanders, well keeping spoilers to minimum I would say that it was funny as it should be. Sarcasm is one of the key types of humor you would find in The Simpsons and this episode just has a bunch of awesome jokes.

Keeping spoilers to minimum I think this was one of the best Baseball themed Simpsons episode ever featuring many Major League Baseball players. Basically Springfield Nuclear Power Plant sign up for some sort of a league where various power plant teams battle against each other but its about Homer here, so there must be some weird, right?

BTW the ending is just awesome! After taking career aptitude tests, Lisa's dreams of becoming a jazz musician are shattered, while Bart is destined to be police officer. After riding with the police, featuring car chases, gun shootouts, and Apu getting tied up in "nylon rope With crushed dreams, Lisa turns to rebellion, nearly smoking, telling the teacher to "shove it" and even hiding the "Teacher's Editions.

The unexpected reversal of morals between Bart and Lisa, with constant underlying humour, make this fine episode. In a tough decision, the Simpsons must decide whether they can pay for an operation to save Santa's Little Helper. After failing to win the lottery, the Simpsons agree to lifestyle sacrifices, saving the dog. These changes soon result in bitterness in the family, causing the dog to run away. This leads him to Mr Burns who trains him to become an attack dog, through the Ludovico technique from Clockwork Orange.

At times, an emotional episode with scenes of conflict between father and son as well as the underlying theme that keeping a family pet is worth any price.

The simple hand-drawn cel animation in this feels charming and comfortable, like a childhood home. Three original songs, cute and well sung. And twenty solid minutes of little jokes and sight gags, the pace was rolling along but not breakneck. Nice to see some of what makes Marge and Homer work as a couple and how Homer feels about that.

A really good episode. Every minute had something funny or human in it. Kind of a letdown after last episode's dense concentration of high quality jokes.

This one wasn't very funny; the few gags were more allusion than humor. This one didn't really land for me. Maybe it's because as an adult, Sideshow Bob seems like such a two-dimensional character to me, compared to the rest of the Simpsons cast, and especially the other villain types like Mr. This stems from the funniest moment in this episode, where Bart encourages Otto to play guitar, and he rocks Free Bird for a stopped bus full of school children while traffic builds behind them.

The amount of characters on the show besides the actual family is unfathomable, and it is always interesting to put the weight of an episode on a more minor character. Otto proves to be a great platform to do this, and his care-free attitude paired with both characters like him Bart, Homer and authority figures Marge, Principal Skinner lead to a great episode. The introduction and the build to the main plot line of the story is somewhat confusing and disjointed and had me questioning what exactly was happening.

Yet, the story of how Homer and his half-brother Herb excellently voiced by Danny DeVito are reunited indirectly by Homer's radiation-caused sterility and Mr. Burns' insatiable desire to protect his wealth leads to a rather heart-warming tale.

There was noticeably a lack of memorable jokes or gags, but there was a scene where Moe's regulars are drunkenly gambling on a race between Marge's recently retired washer and dryer, which had me in a small fit of giggles.

After a Magic 8-ball predicts that their friendship will end, Bart and Milhouse are faced with the ever-so-real killer of hanging out: Milhouse meets Samantha Stank, a new transfer student at their school, and the two of them instantly fall in love. Homer, speaking in near-gibberish after expanding his vocabulary subliminally in an attempt to lose weight, can provide no advice to a guilt-ridden Bart. Milhouse goes to visit Samantha, who does not want to leave her new school, but kisses him though it violates the school policy.

Way to go, Milhouse! After much anticipation, Bart and Lisa are sent to Kamp Krusty only to realize that it's completely dilapidated and that Krusty is unlikely to make an appearance. Meanwhile, charmingly, Homer and Marge are able to seemingly grow some sort of a semblance of a stable and healthy relationship.

Starved, thirsty, and with a broken spirit, Bart begins a rebellion within the camp - leading Krusty to come try to smooth things over by taking the children at the camp to Tijuana. Sometimes I wish I had the Simpsons' childhood.

Moments like that separate The Simpsons from other sitcoms. In the end, Homer comes to value his faith. Burns and Smithers make a truce King Homer eats a lot of people Bart discovers a magic book and tries to revive Snowball the cat He raises the dead and Barney chews on some zombie fat Bart finds the right book to fix his error Treehouse of Horror III, what a terror.

Why are you such a bad kid? Burns falls in love. The episode begins with a parody of '90s dating show "Studs," setting things up for the main storyline in which Bart falls for new neighbor Laura. After finding out that she has fallen for bully Jimbo, Bart intends to end that. That leads him to hire the great Lionel Hutz to sue the restaurant for false advertising. A classic boy-meets-girl story, the episode is fine for what it is, but the love stories are never among my favorites.

This classic episode features Homer buying a plow at an auto show after smashing his car when driving home from Moe's in a snowstorm. To help pay for the cost, he starts a plowing business, Mr. Plow, which is successful until Barney starts his own company, Plow King, and steals most of Homer's customers, causing a competition between the two. Trying to beat Barney, Homer convinces him to plow a mountain, where he gets covered in an avalanche. Other than guest spots by Linda Ronstadt and Adam West, this episode features a realistic story, which is the show at its best.

We see the young Simpsons living tenement style on the lower east side of Springfield with toddler Bart, who spends his days getting into mischief set to the tune of "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. I am so sick of that guy. Highlights of this episode are Dr. McGreg, with a leg for an arm and an arm for a leg! But only by a hair. The fact that they could fit both of them in the same episode and make it work should make Seth MacFarlane ashamed.

But considering it's competition, it's not saying much. Still great, just off pace a bit. This is a true classic. Although probably nothing can stand up to the relationship between Pepsi and Papa Homer.

But can we talk about that dissolve from the bathtub to the soccer net? Homer's face melting on the way home? Considering how static the Season 1 episodes looked yesterday, this episode shows how far "The Simpsons" had evolved and how it would make the most of the possibilities animation offers.

This episode has to include the most charming use of "Monster Mash. After an afternoon of ditching out on work to visit the Duff brewery, Homer gets arrested for driving while drunk, which leads Marge to convince Homer to go sober for thirty days. In the end, it leads to a nice moment between Marge and Homer where he delays his return to alcohol to spend some time together.

The secondary story of Lisa treating Bart like a hamster is hilarious. Watching Bart never learn about getting shocked never gets old - just like Sideshow Bob and the rakes. The dental plan lost for girls and the fellas So they all went on strike; lest they fold like umbrellas.

So I tied an onion to my belt. Which was the style at the time. Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel, and in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on 'em. Gimme five bees for a quarter, you'd say. Now where was I…". The central conceit of the narrative is a scathing critique of institution, be it government, education, group think, or…sexuality as it pertains to cross dressing burlesque shows for Hitler? The episode doesn't have the same teeth other gems in the '93 season had, but the jokes are there.

Plus, it features a statue of Jimmy Carter with Marge's hair. So we've got that going for us. The season 4 finale has Krusty the Klown reeling as his show is cancelled and replaced with ventriloquism act, "Gabbo". Krusty fights to get back on air with a comeback special featuring multiple celebrity appearances.

Overall, a great way to end season 4 with one of Krusty's best episodes. The season 5 premiere has Homer telling the tale of his old barbershop quartet, "The Be Sharps" and their number-one hit "Baby On Board. Plus I'll admit, any episode with a musical number ranks highly in my book, and this one is no exception. This episode was also the second time a member of The Beatles was featured, with George Harrison making a cameo appearance.

A great opener to Season 5 and an all-around classic episode, Homer's Barbershop Quartet was more than a one-hit wonder. But this is "The Simpsons" at its heyday, with a classic Sideshow Bob plot to finally off Bart, complete with the now iconic rake gag. Send him to college to act out most Animal House et al. Ingrid deferred her college admissions for a year so she could travel the world.

For one fleeting moment the world has acted together in defiance of the group, whose isolation is now exposed for all to see. Cause to curve; turn aside, esp. Every time he was asked a difficult question, Senator Warrington deflected by changing the topic, saying he'd answer later, or even—insincerely, it seemed—calling for a moment of prayer.

To help pay the cost of, either in part or full; Members were also reminded that a bring and buy sale would take place at the Federation meeting to help defray the cost of the bus to An Grianan. You can even charge for each note to defray the cost of providing this service. According to this reading, the film is concerned with the extent to which the way we live is governed by machines - and cinema is one of them - that dehumanise our human transactions.

He is the ultimate rage freak, glorying in the heat of his negative reviews while rarely deigning to actually consider the positive. Harmful, unheathful; The Resident Assistant told the first-year students, "I think you will find not only that drugs are illegal and will result in expulsion, but also that drug abuse will have a deleterious effect on anyone's grades.

Fix, mark, or define the boundaries of; The role of an executive coach is delimited by our code of conduct—we may not counsel people for psychological conditions, for instance.

Mark the outline of; sketch; describe in detail; I do need the cash, but I'm not signing up for this psychological experiment unless you delineate what's going to happen. Leaflets published outside the country blamed the government, accusing it of being delinquent in carrying out its duties and criticizing the deployment of troops to suppress the uprising. The use of antidepressants, antipsychotics, or anticholinesterase inhibitors for insomnia related to delirium or dementia is also unproved.

A leader who lies and gains power by arousing the passions and especially prejudices of the people Political demagogues lie and twist the facts, depending more on their natural charisma and ability to determine exactly what their audience wants to hear than any actual understanding or perspicacity.

Both men are renowned for their friendly demeanour and reassuring manner. Show reluctance or object, especially for moral reasons When asked to name her favorite professor in the department, she demurred—she was pretty sure that, if she said anything, it would come back to haunt her. Belittle, attack the reputation of Many jokes in the Meet the Parents trilogy come from Robert De Niro's character denigrating Ben Stiller's character for being a male nurse.

Be a name or symbol for The company's brand denotes quality; the marketing team has done a fantastic job of associating the company's image with fine service. Mock, scoff at, laugh at contemptuously The manager really thought that deriding his employees as "stupid" or "lazy" would motivate them to work harder; instead, it motivated them to constantly hide his office supplies as an act of revenge. Derived from something else; not original The singer's first album was a disappointment, derivative of several hit albums from the previous year, as though a management team had simply picked out the elements from other popular songs that they thought would make the most money.

Thoroughly dried up, dehydrated The key to maintaining odor-free shoes is to desiccate the insole by placing a drying agent, such as a small pouch of baking soda, inside the shoe between wears. Lacking consistency or order, disconnected, sporadic; going off topic Lulu said she'd been studying for the GRE for a year, but she had been doing so in only the most desultory way—a few vocab words here and there, then nothing for a month, and practice tests whenever she felt like it, which was rarely.

Impartial, disinterested; unconcerned, distant, aloof He found her detached demeanor inappropriate for a funeral. It's fine to politely ask how someone died, but it's not appropriate to coldly question a relative on the medical history of the deceased.

Something that restrains or discourages Some argue that the death penalty is a deterrent to crime—that is, the point is not just to punish the guilty, but to frighten other prospective criminals. Very sheer, fine, translucent The wedding dress was a confection of diaphanous silk, made of at least ten layers of the thin fabric, each layer of which was so fine you could see through it.

Bitter, abusive attack or criticism; rant I'd stay out of the living room for a while—Grandpa's on another one of his diatribes about how it's un-American to call a large coffee a "venti.

Division into two parts or into two contradictory groups There is a dichotomy in the sciences between theoretical or "pure" sciences such as physics and chemistry, and the life sciences, which often deal more with classifying than with theorizing. Formal or authoritative pronouncement; saying or proverb "A stitch in time saves nine" is an old dictum meaning that it's easier to solve a problem before it gets too big.

Intended to instruct; teaching, or teaching a moral lesson She might have been Teacher of the Year at work, but at home, her husband wished she would turn off her didactic personality. Lacking confidence, shy Natasha was so diffident that she never believed her comments could be worth anything in class, even when she knew the answer. Spread widely, disseminate verb ; dispersed, widely spread out, or wordy and going off-topic adj The spy attempted to root out the dissenters at the gala, but he was only able to detect a diffuse sense of discontent all around the room.

Go off-topic when speaking or writing Grandpa digressed quite a bit while you were in the kitchen—he was telling us an old war story, but somehow now he's ranting about how nobody celebrates Arbor Day anymore. That digression could take awhile. To become wider or make wider, cause to expand; to speak or write at length, elaborate upon The doctor gave her eye drops to make her pupils dilate.

Slow, late; procrastinating or stalling for time Jack was supposed to start his presentation 10 minutes ago and he isn't even here? I'm not surprised—he's a dilatory fellow. Person who takes up an art or activity for amusement only or in a superficial way The "arts center" in the rich neighborhood was populated by dilettantes—a sculpture here, a bit of music appreciation there, two weeks of painting class until they got bored and quit.

Loud, confused noise, esp. A funeral or mourning song or poem It was supposed to be a wedding march, but when the organist started playing, the reluctant bride thought the song sounded more like a dirge for her former, carefree life.

Free someone from a mistake in thinking Do you really believe that toilets flush one way in the Northern hemisphere and another way in the Southern? Any physicist would be happy to disabuse you of that silly notion.

Having good judgement or insight; able to distinguish mentally In an age in which we are bombarded with advertising, it's important to be a discerning consumer. For instance, the term "all natural" is not federally regulated and doesn't have to mean anything at all, so a smart shopper still reads ingredients.

He hates telemarketers so much that he likes to discomfit them by asking them personal questions and suggesting he call them at their homes instead. Harsh or inharmonious in sound; disagreeing, incongruous In a graduation ceremony full of hopeful and congratulatory speeches, the salutatorian's address about the terrible economy struck a discordant note. Injure the reputation of, destroy credibility of or confidence in Congresswoman Huffman's opponent tried to use her friendship with a certain radical extremist to discredit her, even though the congresswoman hadn't seen this so-called extremist since sixth grade summer camp.

Difference or inconsistency When there is a discrepancy between a store's receipts and the amount of money in the register, the cashier's behavior is generally called into question.

Separate, distinct, detached, existing as individual parts Be sure to use quotation marks and citations as appropriate in your paper in order to keep your ideas discrete from those of the experts you are quoting.

Judicious, discerning, having good judgment or insight He is a man of discriminating tastes—all his suits are handmade in Italy, and I once saw him send back an entree when he complained that black truffle oil had been substituted for white. The chef was astounded. Insincere, not genuine Christine used the fact that her mother spoke limited English as an opportunity to be disingenuous. When her mother asked, "Will there be boys at this sleepover?

Unbiased, impartial; not interested Let's settle this argument once and for all! We'll get a disinterested observer to judge who can sing the highest note! Disconnected, not coherent, jerky; having the joints separated The novel seemed disjointed, as though whole chunks of it were missing, or as though the author had tried to stitch together drafts of several different stories.

Allow to disperse or leave; fire from a job; put aside or reject especially after only a brief consideration "Before I dismiss class," said the teacher, "I want to remind you of the importance of dismissing biases in your research by ruling out or adjusting for factors other than the variable you are testing that may have led to your results.

An ad hominem attack is a logical fallacy in which the arguer disparages his opponent rather than addressing the opponent's ideas. Belittle, put down; bring shame upon, discredit He chose the college for two disparate reasons: Unbiased, not having a selfish or personal motivation; calm, lacking emotion The defendant tearfully described how much her young child needed her at home, but the judge, who dispassionately sentenced her to 10 years for selling drugs, was unmoved.

Speed, promptness; send off or deal with in a speedy way So, you want to be a bike messenger? I need messengers who approach every delivery with alacrity, care, and dispatch—if the customers wanted their packages to arrive slowly, they'd use the post office. Scatter, spread widely, cause to vanish Because the demonstrators didn't have a permit, the police showed up with megaphones, demanding loudly that the crowd disperse. A person;s general or natural mood; tendency She was possessed of a kind and helpful disposition—she wouldn't just help you move, she'd bring home-baked muffins to the affair.

Disturbing, causing anxiety Mr. Peters' lack of emotion at his wife's death was disquieting—so much so, in fact, that even his own family began to suspect he'd had something to do with it. Mislead, conceal the truth, put on a false appearance of Roxanne was used to dissembling in job interviews; when asked about the gap on her resume from , she would say, "Oh, I was out of the workforce fulfilling some obligations"—a somewhat misleading way to describe a prison stint.

Scatter, spread about, broadcast Many plants use attractive fruits to disseminate their seeds—animals eat the fruit and excrete the seeds, allowing new plants to grow. Disagree or take an opposing view, esp. After the protests dissipated, Karachi Electricity Supply's next problem was making customers pay.

Dissolving, the state of having been dissolved; breaking bonds or breaking up of a group of people; death, disintegration; sinking into extreme hedonism, vice, and degradation Raoul went from garden-variety hedonism to utter dissolution—his three-day drug benders cost him his job and may land him in jail.

Harsh, inharmonious sound; cacophony; disagreement After allowing her sixth-grader's heavy metal band to practice in her living room, Mrs. Rosen decided she'd better get used to dissonance. Swell, expand, stretch, bloat The emergency room doctor constantly saw people who came in with distended bellies, sure that they had appendicitis; usually, it was just gas.

Purify; extract the essential elements of While traveling in certain countries, it is important to only drink distilled water so you don't get sick. Act indecisively verb ; a state of fear or trembling excitement "Stop dithering," said the mother to her daughter.

Occurring every day; happening in the daytime rather than at night While many Americans rarely have a sit-down family meal, in many other cultures, dining as a family is a diurnal affair.

Differ, deviate; branch off or turn aside as from a path Go five miles until the old post office, then the road diverges—you want the branch that winds off to the left. Deprive or strip of a rank, title, etc. Discover through divination or supernatural means; perceive by insight I've been poring over these quarterly reports all day, trying to divine whether I should buy or sell this stock.

Person who applies doctrine in an impractical or rigid and close-minded way noun ; merely theoretical, impractical, or fanatical about other people accepting one's ideas adj The old science professor was so doctrinaire that he refused to even consider any evidence that flew in the face of his own research, and thereby failed to recognize when his graduate students made an exciting new discovery. Support with evidence, cite sources in a detailed way, create documentary evidence of Journalists embedded with military units are able to document a war as it happens.

Take off such as clothes , put aside; remove one's hat as a gesture Before the spring break revelers could consider doffing their clothes, they saw the sign: A system of principles laid down by an authority; established belief It is part of the dogma of modern education that there are multiple intelligences that are equally valuable; try to suggest that some people just aren't that smart, and you'll find yourself a pariah.

Asleep, inactive, on a break Some famous writers' skills have lain dormant until quite late in life; Laura Ingalls Wilder didn't publish Little House on the Prairie until she was Join or fit together When the neuroscientist married an exercise physiologist, neither thought they'd end up working together, but when Dr. Marion Ansel received a grant to study how exercise improves brain function and Dr.

Jim Ansel was assigned to her team, the two found that their careers dovetailed nicely. He drawled his name in a Southern accent. Funny in an odd way The play was a droll production—not laugh-out-loud hilarious, but funny especially because it was so strange. Who's ever seen a fairy be mistaken for a block of cheese? Person who is easily fooled or used noun ; to fool or exploit verb The dashing rogue used flattery and lies to dupe several old ladies out of their money.

Deceit, double-dealing, acting in two different ways for the purpose of deception The campaign worker's duplicity finally came to light when it was discovered that, despite rising to a trusted position within the local Workers Party, he was actually a registered National Party member and was feeding information back to his cronies.

Grumpy, pessimistic, irritable; suffering from dyspepsia indigestion The dyspeptic professor was so angered by a question from a student who hadn't done the homework that he actually stomped out of class.

Very enthusiastic, lively, excited; bubbling as though being boiled The children were so ebullient upon their arrival at Disneyworld that their parents, while happy to see them so excited, wished that there were a way to forcibly restrain them in case they took off running towards the rides.

Peculiar, off, deviating from the norm esp. A level, rank or grade; the people at that level Obtaining a job on Wall Street doesn't guarantee access to the upper echelon of executives, where multimillion dollar bonuses are the norm. Selecting the best of everything or from many diverse sources Eclectic taste is helpful in being a DJ—crowds love to hear the latest hip-hop mixed with '80s classics and other unexpected genres of music.

The obscuring of one thing by another, such as the sun by the moon or a person by a more famous or talented person noun ; to obscure, darken, make less important verb During a solar eclipse, the moon eclipses the Sun. Uplift, enlighten, instruct or improve in a spiritual or moral way Look, Son, I'm glad that you're reading, but I really wish you would read something more edifying than that magazine that gives tips for winning at violent video games.

He had a high and somewhat effeminate voice. The quality of being able to produce the intended effect Extensive trials will be necessary to determine whether the drug's efficacy outweighs the side effects. Representation or image of a person, esp. Jackson thought his daughter's boyfriend guilty of the worst effrontery when he asked for her hand in marriage—and, as soon as Mr. Jackson gave his blessing, followed up by asking for a job at Mr.

Related to the belief of the equality of all people, esp. Extraordinary or conspicuously bad; glaring Your conduct is an egregious violation of our Honor Code—not only did you steal your roommate's paper off his computer and turn it in as your own, you also sold his work to a plagiarism website so other cheaters could purchase it!

An exit or the action of exiting It is against the fire code to put those boxes there—you can't block a primary or secondary egress from the building. Very happy, in high spirits I am elated that you flew my twin brother in from Australia to surprise me at my birthday party! Song or poem of sorrow, esp. Raise, lift up; lift the spirits of; move up to a higher rank or status or raise up to a higher spiritual or intellectual plane After a year getting coffee and making copies, he hoped to be promoted to a more elevated position suitable for a law school graduate.

Call forth, bring out, evoke The touchdown elicited wild cheers from the crowd. Someone who believes in rule by an elite group. Marked by forceful, fluid, apt speech; expressive, emotionally moving Wow, he's such an eloquent speaker, he could sell snow to Antarcticans! Make abnormally thin, cause to physically waste away After 50 days floating on a raft at sea, he was quite emaciated—his family was elated that he was alive, but shocked to see a formerly pound man looking skeletal at just pounds.

Decorate, add ornamentation; enhance a story with fictional or fanciful details Every time she tells that story, she embellishes it quite a bit—at first, she was lost in the woods, and then she was found. The part with the grizzly bear was added later. To become caught up in a scandal. Prominent, distinguished, of high rank The undergraduate shocked everyone by asking the eminent old professor, "Really?

What makes you such an expert? Coming from, based on, or able to be verified by experience or experimentation; not purely based on theory The Ancient Greeks philosophized about the nature of matter concluding, for instance, that everything was made of earth, water, air, and fire without any empirical evidence—that is, the very idea of conducting experiments hadn't been invented yet. Copy in an attempt to equal or be better than The ardent Star Trek fan emulated Captain Kirk in every way possible—his brash and confident leadership might have gotten him somewhere, but the women he tried to impress weren't so impressed.

Warm, glowing praise, esp. Unfortunately, those doorways are precisely where building managers will want to stack sandbags to block encroaching water. Native, local; natural, specific to, or confined to a particular place Certain diseases—especially those that require a precise mix of environmental conditions and local plant and animal life to thrive—remain endemic to particular regions. Weaken, tire After taking the SAT in the morning and playing in a soccer game in the afternoon, Trina was truly enervated before the prom even began.

In the late s, newly enfranchised African Americans began getting appointments as postmasters, clerks and letter carriers, said a report from the agency's historian. Produce, give rise to, cause to exist; procreate The television demagogue was blamed for engendering hate and divisiveness. Raise to a higher value, desirability, etc. The cosmetics industry stays in business because so many people want to enhance their appearances. Puzzle, mystery, riddle; mysterious or contradictory person The enormous rock sculptures in Stonehenge are truly an enigma—were they created as part of a religious observance, or in deference to a great ruler?

We may never know. Having the right to certain privileges; believing, sometimes without cause, that one deserves or has the right to certain privileges Many bosses complain about young people's sense of entitlement—raised on a steady diet of praise from parents and teachers, these young people are shocked to be expected to "pay their dues" at a new job.

Count or list; specify one-by-one The Bill of Rights enumerates the basic rights held by every citizen of the United States. Lasting only a short time, fleeting "Thank you for this jacket that says 'Eugene's Girl,'" said Marie, "but I fear that your love will prove to be ephemeral—over the last two years, I've seen four other girls in school with the same jacket. Do you buy them in six-packs? Person with cultivated, refined tastes, esp. Composure, evenness of mind; mental or emotional stability, esp.

Use unclear language to deceive or avoid committing to a position Not wanting to lose supporters, the politician equivocated on the issue, tossing out buzzwords related to each side while also claiming more study was needed. Wandering, not sticking to a circumscribed path. Inconsistent, wandering, having no fixed course When someone engages in erratic behavior, family members often suspect drug use or mental illness. However, sometimes the person is just building a top-secret invention in the garage!

Mistaken, in error; improper, morally incorrect Hilda was completely unable to assemble her new desk chair after the instructions erroneously instructed her to screw the left armrest onto a small lever on the bottom of the seat. Artificial, synthetic; being an inferior substitute I hate this health food restaurant!

I do not want to eat some ersatz meatballs made of textured vegetable protein! Former, previous adj ; in the past, formerly adv A novelist and erstwhile insurance salesman, he told us his story of the long road to literary success, before he was able to quit his day job.

Scholarly, knowledgeable; possessing deep, often systematic knowledge Some have said that Americans dislike erudite leaders; while German leaders frequently have Ph. Shun, avoid, abstain from As a vegan, he eschewed not only meat and dairy but also anything made of leather. Understood by or intended for only a few; secret In his first year of university-level physics, he felt he was merely memorizing information found in every textbook on the subject; by his fourth year, he spent his days poring over esoteric journal articles that few people had ever read or understood.

Worthy of esteem, admirable; able to be estimated As the first black president of the Harvard Law Review, Barack Obama presented an estimable resume when he ran for president in The character, personality, or moral values specific to a person, group, time period, etc. At the prep school, the young man happily settled into an ethos of hard work and rigorous athletic competition.

Speech of praise or written work of praise, esp. Substitution of a mild, inoffensive, or indirect expression for one that is considered offensive or too direct Many euphemisms surround death and disease; rather than "Joe died of cancer," many people feel better saying "Joe's suffering is finally over. Pleasing or sweet sound, especially as formed by a harmonious use of words Poetry in translation can keep its meaning, but often loses the euphony the poet worked so laboriously to create.

Make worse more violent, severe , inflame; irritate or embitter a person Allowing your band to practice in our garage has greatly exacerbated my headache. Very severe in making demands; requiring precise attention The boxing coach was exacting, analyzing Joey's footwork down to the millimeter and forcing him to repeat movements hundreds of times until they were correct.

The candidates have publicly excoriated each other throughout the campaign. It is watching as someone else enjoys what you most desire on earth. Clear from guilt or blame The security camera footage showing Mr. Murphy to have been in a casino the entire night turned out to be just the evidence needed to exculpate him of robbing a bank 50 miles away.

Comprehensive, thorough, exhausting a topic or subject, accounting for all possibilities; draining, tending to exhaust The Standard Book of British Birds provides an exhaustive treatment of the subject—you will find that not a single British bird has been omitted.

She exhorted her listeners to support the proposition. Clear from blame or accusation; free from a responsibility When the defendant was exonerated after a long trial, his family wept for joy. Communicative; talking in a sociable manner;.

Suitable, proper; effective, often at the expense of ethics or other considerations "I need this report by 2pm, and I don't care what you have to do to make that happen," said the boss. Obama signed an executive order that helped expedite federal review and permitting on seven infrastructure projects, including two at Jaxport. Expletives were deleted from the transcript of their conversation.

Direct, clear, fully revealed; clearly depicting sex or nudity The goal of my motivational talk is to make explicit the connection between staying in school and avoiding a life of crime. Person who expounds or explains; champion, advocate, or representative An exponent of clean fuel, he petitioned the state government to commit to replacing conventional energy with solar and wind energy where possible. The article expounds the virtues of a healthy diet.

When asked to expound, he had no comment. To wipe out or remove any trace off. Censor; remove objectionable or offensive parts When the girl discovered that her ninth-grade class had been reading an expurgated version of Romeo and Juliet, she immediately checked the original out from the library so she could read all the "forbidden" parts. Still in existence; Not destroyed or lost. Done without preparation esp. Irrelevant; foreign, coming from without, not belonging This essay would be stronger if you removed extraneous information; this paragraph about the author's life doesn't happen to be relevant to your thesis.

Conjecture about an unknown by projecting information about something known; predict by projecting past experience No, I've never been to Bryn Mawr, but I've visited several small, private women's colleges in the Northeast, so I think I can extrapolate.

The film is notable for its extravagant settings and special effects. We're going on a less extravagant vacation this year. Her extravagant spending has to stop. I would like my nightgown back now. Trying new things is good.

Make easier, help the progress of A good meeting facilitator lets everyone be heard while still keeping the meeting focused. Group or clique within a larger organization; party strife and dissension The opposition movement was once large enough to have a chance at succeeding, but it has since broken into numerous, squabbling factions, each too small to have much impact. The USA seems to have involved itself in a factious civil war with no end in sight - and to greater cost than gain.

Containing a fallacy, or mistake in logic; logically unsound; deceptive The formal study of logic can enable a student to more easily identify fallacious reasoning and, furthermore, to point out its fallacies. Left unplanted of land ; not in use Crop yields were increased substantially when the villagers discovered that leaving a portion of their fields lie fallow allowed that unused part of the land to become renewed with minerals. Excessively devoted, enthusiastic, or zealous in an uncritical way We avoid our neighbors—they're fanatics who can't go five minutes without trying to convert you to their beliefs.

Becker was fanatical about grammar, once deducting 15 points from a student's paper for a misused semicolon—and it was a physics class!

Whimsical, capricious; imaginary; freely imaginative rather than based on reason or reality The play was set in a fanciful version of New York City, one where all the cab drivers spoke perfect English and the Statue of Liberty seemed to be in the middle of the island. Excessively particular, difficult to please; painstaking, meticulous, requiring excessive attention to detail Steve was a fastidious housekeeper, fluffing his couch pillows at least twice a day and never allowing the tiniest speck of dust to settle on any exposed surface.

Measure the depth of usually of water as with a sounding line; penetrate and discover the meaning of, understand I cannot even remotely fathom how you interpreted an invitation to sleep on my couch as permission to take my car on a six-hour joyride! Show affection or try to please in the manner of a dog; try to win favor through flattery and submissive behavior Although he was only president of a chain of grocery stores, he was used to being fawned over like a king or rock star.

Possible; logical or likely; suitable Your plan to promote our product launch with a parade is just not feasible—we don't have the money or enough time to get the permits. Obama is seen as a feckless wimp. Fruitful, fertile; capable of abundantly producing offspring, vegetation, or creative or intellectual work Rabbits are quite fecund; if you've got two, you'll soon have forty.

Admirably appropriate, very well-suited for the occasion; pleasant, fortunate, marked by happiness "What a felicitous occasion! The new father found the balloon remarkably felicitous, especially since the baby's gender had been announced less than an hour ago. Very hot; heated in passion or enthusiasm He is a fervid fan of Virginia Tech football, so much so that we've all gotten used to receiving "Go Hokies!

Stinking; having an offensive smell I hate doing your laundry—it's always full of fetid gym socks. Is she telling fibs again? Faithfulness, loyalty; strict observance of duty; accuracy in reproducing a sound or image Wedding vows typically include a promise of fidelity—such as by "forsaking all others as long as I may live.

Metaphorical, based on figures of speech; containing many figures of speech as fancy-sounding writing ; related to portraying human or animal figures The painter was renowned for his figurative art, including many portraits—he had been known to say that abstract artists were just people who had never learned to draw. Extreme delicacy, subtlety, or diplomacy in handling a sensitive situation or in performance or skill noun ; use tact of diplomacy; employ a deceptive strategy verb After the prince deeply insulted his hosts, the diplomat was able to finesse the situation, playing it off as a translation error and getting the negotiations back on track.

Several fitful attempts at negotiation have failed. Her mother should bite her lip and let the romance fizzle out naturally. So why does this flaccid film get the bonus of three AFF screenings? Get tired, lose enthusiasm; hang limply or droop Our grandmother is so physically fit that she was ready to make the rounds of the entire amusement park again after lunch, while most of us were flagging and just wanted to sit. A young bird that has just recently gotten its feathers, an inexperienced person noun ; new or inexperienced adj The zoo's EagleCam will hopefully be able to catch the moment the fledglings fly out of the nest for the very first time!

Swindle or dupe; to deprive of money or belongings by fraud, hoax. Passing quickly, transitory I had assumed our summer romance would be fleeting, so I was very surprised when you proposed marriage! Reddish or rosy; flowery, showy, or excessively fancy His writing was so florid that it was hard for modern readers to understand, and unintentionally humorous when they did.

He once called a woman in a hoop skirt a "confection of gossamer-clad ephemerality, the bounty of her raiment ringing in my turgid heart like the tintinnabulation of so many church bells. Treat with disdain, contempt, or scorn usually of rules He flouted the boarding school's curfew so blatantly that, on his way back from a party that lasted past midnight, he actually stopped by the headmaster's house to say hello to his daughter.

Stroke of luck, something accidentally successful It's amazing that I won the prize during halftime, but I guarantee you, it was just a fluke that I made that basket—if I tried a thousand more times, I'm sure I couldn't do it again.

To turn red; To be in abundance; To drive out of hiding;. Weiner, despite his foibles. Incite, instigate, stir up, promote the growth of; apply medicated liquid to a body part The revolutionary group was quietly fomenting a rebellion, galvanizing student radicals, leading unions in revolutionary songs, and anonymously pasting incendiary posters in every quarter of the city.

Wander in search of; rummage, hunt, make a raid It's important to seal your trash cans tightly in this neighborhood, or else you'll get raccoons foraging for food in your backyard. The German raised his eyebrows, but forbore to elicit further information concerning Jaures' motives. Place where a river or similar body of water is shallow enough to walk or ride a vehicle across noun ; to cross at such a place verb The pioneers made camp near the riverbank, waiting for the rains to die down and the river to become fordable again.

A week later, the waters were shallow enough to ford the river with their entire caravan—horses, wagons, and all. Indicate or suggest beforehand, presage You didn't know this was a horror movie? I thought it was pretty clear that the children's ghost story around the campfire was meant to foreshadow the horrible things that would happen to them years later as teenagers at a motel in the middle of the woods.

Delay, hinder, prevent by taking action beforehand Our research has been forestalled by a lack of funding; we're all just biding our time while we wait for the university to approve our grant proposal.

Surrender or lose as a result of an error, crime, or failure to fulfill an obligation "The rules are clear," said the umpire. Sorry, everybody, no game today! Ng forges roads back to Singapore's locavore cuisine, chefs and diners are discovering heirloom vegetables, fruits and long forsaken herbs. Strengthen, invigorate, encourage The white bread found in American grocery stores has been stripped of all the nutrients naturally found in wheat, and then artificially fortified with vitamins and minerals.

Happening by chance; lucky It was amazingly fortuitous that the exclusive beach resort had a cancellation for exactly the weekend she had wanted to get married, allowing her to have the perfect wedding after all. Noisy disturbance or fight; brawl Rugby is one of the most aggressive of sports—when the players rush to pile on top of the person with the ball, bones can easily be broken in the fracas.

Unruly, troublemaking; irritable The Students for Progressive Action were a fractious bunch, always fighting with one another over exactly which progressive action should take priority.

And so, for children of immigrants, the creative path is fraught with added risk: There's so much more at stake if you fail. In America's Assembly Line, David Nye examines the industrial innovation that made the United States productive and wealthy in the twentieth century. The assembly line -- developed at the Ford Motor Company in for the mass production of Model Ts -- first created and then served an expanding mass market. It inspired fiction, paintings, photographs, comedy, cafeteria layouts, andcookie-cutter suburban housing.

It also transformed industrial labor and provoked strikes and uniondrives. By , Japan had reinvented the assembly line as a system of "leanmanufacturing"; American industry reluctantly adopted this new approach. Nye describes thisevolution and the new global landscape of increasingly automated factories, with fewer industrialjobs in America and questionable working conditions in developing countries.

A century after Ford'spioneering innovation, the assembly line continues to evolve toward more sustainablemanufacturing. Library West, On Order. The tumultuous era and remarkable personalities that unexpectedly birthed the Federal Reserve, from renowned financial writer Roger Lowenstein Until the election of Woodrow Wilson the United States—alone among developed nations—lacked a central bank.

However, in the aftermath of a disastrous financial panic, Congress was persuaded—by a confluence of populist unrest, widespread mistrust of bankers, ideological divisions, and secretive lobbying—to approve the landmark Federal Reserve Act.

Writing in a rich and untapped historical vein, Roger Lowenstein—acclaimed financial journalist and bestselling author of When Genius Failed and The End of Wall Street—reveals the drama-filled, unlikely story of how America created the Federal Reserve, thereby taking its first steps onto the world stage as a global financial power.

Aldrich, the reigning power broker in the U. Weaving a slice of American politics together with a storied financial collapse and intrigue at the highest levels of Washington and Wall Street, Lowenstein delivers a gripping historical narrative. C3 N37 Library West. The definitive life of Andrew Carnegie-one of American business's most iconic and elusive titans-by the bestselling author of Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. Celebrated historian David Nasaw, brings new life to the story of one of America's most famous and successful businessmen and philanthropistsin what will prove to be the biography of the season.

With a trove of new material--unpublished chapters of Carnegie's Autobiography; personal letters between Carnegie and his future wife, Louise, and other family members; his prenuptial agreement; diaries of family and close friends; his applications for citizenship; his extensive correspondence with Henry Clay Frick; and dozens of private letters to and from presidents Grant, Cleveland, McKinley, Roosevelt, and British prime ministers Gladstone and Balfour, as well as friends Herbert Spencer, Matthew Arnold, and Mark Twain--Nasaw brilliantly plumbs the core of this facinating and complex man, deftly placing his life in cultural and political context as only a master storyteller can.

Akerlof and Robert J. P8 A Library West. The global financial crisis has made it painfully clear that powerful psychological forces are imperiling the wealth of nations today.

From blind faith in ever-rising housing prices to plummeting confidence in capital markets, "animal spirits" are driving financial events worldwide. George Akerlof and Robert Shiller challenge the economic wisdom that got us into this mess, and put forward a bold new vision that will transform economics and restore prosperity.

They reassert the necessity of an active government role in economic policymaking by recovering the idea of animal spirits, a term John Maynard Keynes used to describe the gloom and despondence that led to the Great Depression and the changing psychology that accompanied recovery. Like Keynes, Akerlof and Shiller know that managing these animal spirits requires the steady hand of government. They detail the most pervasive effects of animal spirits in contemporary economic life and show how Reaganomics, Thatcherism, and the rational expectations revolution failed to account for them.

Animal Spiritsoffers a road map for reversing the financial misfortunes besetting us today. Read it and learn how leaders can channel animal spirits--the powerful forces of human psychology that are afoot in the world economy today.

T Library West. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world. Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, and turmoil.

In Antifragile,Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better. The antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events. How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives?

The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems, and medicine. In addition to the street wisdom of Fat Tony of Brooklyn, the voices and recipes of ancient wisdom, from Roman, Greek, Semitic, and medieval sources, are loud and clear. Antifragileis a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world. M Library West, On Order.

Dubai's Burj Khalifa--the world's tallest building--looks nothing like Microsoft's Office Suite, and digital surround sound doesn't work like a citywide telecommunication grid. Yet these engineering feats have much in common. Applied Minds explores the unique visions and mental tools of engineers to reveal the enormous--and often understated--influence they wield in transforming problems into opportunities. An engineer himself, Guru Madhavan introduces a flexible intellectual tool kit called modular systems thinking as he explains the discipline's penchant for seeing structure where there is none.

The creations that result from this process express the engineer's answers to the fundamental questions of design: Through narratives and case studies spanning the brilliant history of engineering, Madhavan shows how the concepts of prototyping, efficiency, reliability, standards, optimization, and feedback are put to use in fields as diverse as transportation, retail, health care, and entertainment. Equal parts personal, practical, and profound, Applied Minds charts a path to a future where we apply strategies borrowed from engineering to create useful and inspired solutions to our most pressing challenges.

In this book, Simon Bowmaker offers a remarkable collection of conversations with leading economists about research in economics. He has selected a broad sample of the great economists of our time, including people whose perspectives span most of the major subdivisions of economics research, from micro to macro, from theoretical to empirical, from rationalist to behavioralist. This innovative volume contains 25 interviews with practicing economists, presenting insightful personal accounts into an often-misunderstood field.

Contributors to this volume were asked to reflect on their own experience in economics research, including their methods of working, the process of scientific discovery and knowledge creation, and the challenges of successfully disseminating their work. The unique and compelling interview format showcases each contributor's personal connection to his or her work, presenting a view of current economics research that is technical, comprehensive, and refreshingly human.

Both students and current scholars in economics will find much to admire in this book's window into the inner workings of some of the brightest and best-known minds in the field. I94 Library West. Whether mundane or life-altering, these choices define us and shape our lives. Sheena Iyengar asks the difficult questions about how and why we choose: Is the desire for choice innate or bound by culture? Why do we sometimes choose against our best interests?

How much control do we really have over what we choose? Sheena Iyengar's award-winning research reveals that the answers are surprising and profound. In our world of shifting political and cultural forces, technological revolution, and interconnected commerce, our decisions have far-reaching consequences.

C45 L45 e-book MyiLibrary. Your guide to becoming an explanation specialist. You've done the hard work. Your product or service works beautifully - but something is missing. People just don't see the big idea - and it's keeping you from being successful.

Your idea has an explanation problem. The Art of Explanation is for business people, educators and influencers who want to improve their explanation skills and start solving explanation problems. Author Lee LeFever is the founder of Common Craft, a company known around the world for making complex ideas easy to understand through short animated videos. He is your guide to helping audiences fall in love with your ideas, products or services through better explanations in any medium. You will learn to: Learn explanation basics, what causes them to fail and how to diagnose explanation problems.

Using simple elements, create an explanation strategy that builds confidence and motivates your audience. Produce remarkable explanations with visuals and media. The Art of Explanation is your invitation to become an explanation specialist and see why explanation is now a fundamental skill for professionals. The Art of Negotiation: W49 Library West.

A member of the world-renowned Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School introduces the powerful next-generation approach to negotiation. For many years, two approaches to negotiation have prevailed: Michael Wheeler provides a dynamic alternative to one-size-fits-all strategies that don't match real world realities. The Art of Negotiation shows how master negotiators thrive in the face of chaos and uncertainty. They understand negotiation as a process of exploration that demands ongoing learning, adapting, and influencing.

Their agility enables them to reach agreement when others would be stalemated. Michael Wheeler illuminates the improvisational nature of negotiation, drawing on his own research and his work with Program on Negotiation colleagues. He explains how the best practices of diplomats such as George J.

Mitchell, dealmaker Bruce Wasserstein, and Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub apply to everyday transactions like selling a house, buying a car, or landing a new contract. Wheeler also draws lessons on agility and creativity from fields like jazz, sports, theater, and even military science. The Art of Strategy: D Library West. Game theory means rigorous strategic thinking. Though parts of game theory involve simple common sense, much is counterintuitive, and it can only be mastered by developing a new way of seeing the world.

Using a diverse array of rich case studies—from pop culture, TV, movies, sports, politics, and history—the authors show how nearly every business and personal interaction has a game-theory component to it. Mastering game theory will make you more successful in business and life, and this lively book is the key to that mastery.

The Ascent of Money: F47 Library West. Niall Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of finance, from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest upheavals. To Christians, love of it is the root of all evil. To generals, it's the sinews of war. To revolutionaries, it's the chains of labor. But historian Ferguson shows that finance is in fact the foundation of human progress. What's more, he reveals financial history as the essential backstory behind all history.

Through Ferguson's expert lens, for example, the civilization of the Renaissance looks very different: The rise of the Dutch republic is reinterpreted as the triumph of the world's first modern bond market over insolvent Habsburg absolutism.

Yet the central lesson of financial history is that, sooner or later, every bubble bursts. If you think those are the things to focus on in building an investment portfolio, Andrew Ang has accumulated a body of research that will prove otherwise. In his new book Asset Management: A Systematic Approach to Factor Investing, Ang upends the conventional wisdom about asset allocation by showing that what matters aren't asset class labels but the bundles of overlapping risks they represent.

Making investments is like eating a healthy diet, Angsays: Failing to do so can lead to a serious case of malnutrition - for investors as well as diners. The key, in Ang's view, is bad times, and the fact that every investor's bad times are somewhat different. The notion that bad times are paramount is the guiding principle of the book, which offers a new approach to the age-old problem of where do you put your money?

Years of experience, both as afinance professor and as a consultant, have led Ang to see that the traditional approach, with its focus on asset classes, is too crude and ultimately too costly to serve investors adequately. He focuses instead on "factor risks," the peculiar sets of hard times that cut across asset classes, andthat must be the focus of our attention if we are to weather market turmoil and receive the rewards that come with doing so. Optimally harvesting factor premiums - on our own or by hiring others -r equires identifying your particular set of hard times, and exploiting the difference between them andthose of the average investor.

Clearly written yet chock-full of the latest research and data, Asset Management will be indispensable reading for trustees, professional money managers, smart private investors, and business students who want to understand the economics behind factor risk premiums, harvest them efficiently in theirportfolios, and embark on the search for true alpha.

Economists make confident assertions in op-ed columns and on cable news-so why are their explanations often at odds with equally confident assertions from other economists? And why are all economic predictions so rarely borne out? Harnessing his frustration with these contradictions, Jonathan Schlefer set out to investigate how economists arrive at their opinions. While economists cloak their views in the aura of science, what they actually do is make assumptions about the world, use those assumptions to build imaginary economies known as models , and from those models generate conclusions.

Schlefer takes up current controversies such as income inequality and the financial crisis, for which he holds economists in large part accountable. Although theorists won international acclaim for creating models that demonstrated the inherent instability of markets, ostensibly practical economists ignored those accepted theories and instead relied on their blind faith in the invisible hand of unregulated enterprise.

Schlefer explains how the politics of economics allowed them to do so. The Assumptions Economists Make renders the behavior of economists much more comprehensible, if not less irrational. W82 Library West, On Order. From Tim Wu, author of the award-winning The Master Switch a New Yorker and Fortune Book of the Year and who coined the term "net neutrality"--a revelatory, ambitious and urgent account of how the capture and re-sale of human attention became the defining industry of our time.

American business depends on it. In nearly every moment of our waking lives, we face a barrage of messaging, advertising enticements, branding, sponsored social media, and other efforts to harvest our attention. Few moments or spaces of our day remain uncultivated by the "attention merchants," contributing to the distracted, unfocused tenor of our times.

Tim Wu argues that this condition is not simply the byproduct of recent technological innovations but the result of more than a century's growth and expansion in the industries that feed on human attention.

Wu describes the revolts that have risen against the relentless siege of our awareness, from the remote control to the creation of public broadcasting to Apple's ad-blocking OS. We've become the consumers, the producers, and the content.

We are selling ourselves to ourselves. A devastating critique of ad tech as it stands today, transforming "don't be evil" into the surveillance business model in just a few short years. It connects the dots between the sale of advertising inventory in schools to the bizarre ecosystem of trackers, analyzers and machine-learning models that allow the things you look at on the web to look back at you This stuff is my daily beat, and I learned a lot from Attention Merchants.

Auctions by Timothy P. H83 Library West, On Order. Although it is among the oldest of market institutions, the auction is ubiquitous in today's economy, used for everything from government procurement to selling advertising on the Internet to course assignment at MIT's Sloan School. And yet beyond the small number of economists who specialize in the subject, few people understand how auctions really work.

This concise, accessible, and engaging book explains both the theory and the practice of auctions. It describes the main auction formats and pricing rules, develops a simple model to explain bidder behavior, and provides a range of real-world examples. The authors explain what constitutes an auction and how auctions can be modeled as games of asymmetric information -- that is, games in which some players know something that other players do not.

They characterize behavior in these strategic situations and maintain a focus on the real world by illustrating their discussions with examples that include not just auctions held by eBay and Sotheby's, but those used by Google, the U.

Treasury, TaskRabbit, and charities. Readers will begin to understand how economists model auctions and how the rules of the auction shape bidder incentives. They will appreciate the role auctions play in our modern economy and understand why these selling mechanisms are so resilient. Rangaswami Contribution by Call Number: The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a year long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact.

The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we re likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action.

John Wells

When Bart doesn't get the same treatment at home, he decides to live at the mansion. He grows to miss his family, but Burns tricks him into believing his family doesn't want him anymore. When Burns demands that Bart fire his father to prove his loyalty, Bart realizes he loves his family and fires Mr. Burns as his "Dad. After Bart accidentally gets Principal Skinner fired, he hangs out with Skinner out of guilt, and the two become friends. But Skinner misses his authoritative role, and re-enlists in the Army.

Meanwhile, Skinner's replacement Ned Flanders lets the school fall into chaos, and Bart realizes he needs Skinner as his counter-character. Bart schemes to get Flanders fired, which ultimately happens when Chalmers witnesses, not the chaos, but the religious element that Flanders brought to the school. With Bart's advice, Skinner is able to get out of the Army and get his job back. Bart, in turn, gets his nemesis back. An episode that comes across fairly flat. To teach a class on having a good marriage, of course!

After some thought, he comes to realise that his gift to Marge is total dependence on her, and they happily make up. Thanks to a gift telescope from Lisa, he spots Flanders screaming and burying something in the backyard. Thinking he killed Maude, he sends Lisa into his home to investigate. Once getting caught though, they find out it was just a plant he killed while Maude was away.

As evident from the title, this is a Lisa episode — and that's a great thing. We don't get too many Lisa-centric episodes, and this is a good one. In a nutshell, Lisa takes pride in being the top brain at Springfield Elementary. When a new girl comes to town and is seemingly better than Lisa at everything, the middle-Simpson isn't quite sure how to cope.

In the end, that status-quo is restored, but there are some good bits along the way. Lisa having a hard time even bounch a ball is a high-point.

The clip shows can be hit or miss in the days of DVD and on-demand, but back in the day, and episode like this would give you a nice trip down memory lane. In the episode, Marge laments over the current lull in her marriage. Homer reminds her, through a series of clips, that their relationship is strong. Unfortunately, he only reinforces how tumultuous things have been. All in all, a good episode to relive some classic moments, with a nice little wrapper setting them up.

Bob claims to be reformed, runs against Quimby in the mayoral race and wins. Sideshow Bob goes back to prison and all is right Springfield again. I'd like to focus on perhaps my favorite Treehouse segment of all time — "Time and Punishment". We hear Grandpa Simpson's astute advice to Homer on his wedding night: Because even the slightest change can alter the future in ways you can't imagine.

I think most of us would agree with that. Bart's crush on Reverend Lovejoy's daughter, Jessica, teaches us two lessons: People aren't always who you think they are.

The perfect reverend's daughter turns out to be far worse than Bart is. Guys will do anything to win the favor of a pretty girl. Not the best episode of the stellar Season 6, but upon re-watching reminds us that The Simpsons at its best is a grounded family drama complete with allegories.

The cut-aways, literal humor Sarah plain and tall , physical comedy, and pop culture references "Silence of the Lambs" are what make The Simpsons special. That's why you're here! This venture turns up the volume on the sibling rivalry between Bart and Lisa, as they are forced to go against each other in a matchup the entire town of Springfield is excited to see. The loser will be taunted and booed until my throat is sore.

While Homer keeps making things worse for himself, an unexpected ally comes in the form of the peeping Groundskeeper Willie, whose video evidence frees Homer from the accusations.

Homer, I thought you were an animal, but your daughter said you were a decent man. I guess she was right. Homer and Marge are lacking intimacy in their marriage.

Grampa Simpson comes to the rescue with an old family remedy. After seeing the success of the remedy, Homer and Grampa start selling the remedy to others in Springfield. Realizing Grampa never supported him, Homer fights with Grampa, who calls Homer an accident, leading to the end of their Simpson and Son business. Later, Homer and Grampa hug it out, calling themselves screw ups. Remember, "if it is in a book, then it has to be real".

Mistaken for a pilot, Homer causes an accident, leading to unlimited tickets for the Simpsons as the airline company covers it up. While the plane is preparing to takeoff, Marge freaks out, exposing her fear of flying. Seeing a therapist, Marge learns her fear stems from learning her father was a flight stewardess and not a pilot. Never unscrew the top of a shaker as a prank.

If your name is Guyin Cognito, run. Always repress your emotions. And remember, fix the roof and then bake. The episode is itself like "We Do," crammed with jokes, references and backstory. In some minutes, Homer goes from outsider to insider to leader to outsider again of the mysterious organization.

Homer the Great and Maggie Makes Three, the following episode, are debatably the perfect Simpsons pairing: Shortly after, Maggie is born. Unable to support a third child, Homer must return to the plant, hat in hand. The arc is simple, relatable and uplifting: Predictably, this is a great episode from a great Simpsons season. More predictable but distressing? All of the political satire is still sharp.

From the start, where military pilots bicker about funding healthcare over military, to the end, where Congressional greed prevents Springfield from being saved from the titular comet, all of the satire is as relevant as ever. And now a list of people Homer considered more useful to the post-apocalyptic Springfield than Ned Flanders: So much happens in these episodes; that whole summary only two-thirds of the episode!

They make the car go faster. In this episode, Springfield decided to host a Film Festival. This episode was really a cross between The Simpson and The Critic. The Critic was a short-lived animated series started by Al Jean. Lisa's Wedding is the first of four episodes currently that take place in the future. The episode eases in with some jokes at a renaissance fair. Lisa meeting a fortune teller who tells her of her future of love. Lisa, who is 23 now, falls in love with a British character, Hugh Parkfield.

Hugh asks Lisa to marry him while in England, and they fly back so Hugh can finally meet the rest of the Simpsons. Lisa discovers that Hugh cannot stand her family and ultimately the relationship ends on Lisa choosing her dysfunctional family over her love. One of my favorite episodes. After the puppies begin to stand, reminding him of Rory Calhoun, Mr.

Burns decides not to kill them, and instead they win millions in dog racing. Seriously, this one is a classic with great jokes in it. This episode is great just because it breaks a lot of moulds for characters - watching Bart have to behave because his mom is the teacher, watching Lisa struggle in a world without school to excel at, and watching Skinner fight with someone other than Bart.

In which Marge foils a counterfeit jeans ring operating out of her car-hole. Though it reaches the high bar for humor that classic Simpsons episodes set, the narrative arc here is actually as shoddy as those jeans.

The setup, Marge seeking adrenaline after an unexpected triumph over hoodlums giving three-card monte a bad name and becoming a cop, is solid. Relative to its era, this episode is certainly substandard. Homer is great and "stupider like a fox" too. Most Simpsons fans will agree, Lemon of Troy is easily a top ten episode, maybe even in the top five. I'd call Lemon of Troy a favorite episode myself. Burns, you insufferable shit. We all shot you. You've gone beyond the pale this time.

While we've cowed to your demands and suffered your indignities in the past, no more. You, sir are a coward and a scoundrel. Burn in hell Mr. The show sports a cast of characters so robust and memorable it can sustain a two-part murder mystery, replete with hilarious and fitting roles for each Springfield denizen. Milhouse has greatness thrust upon him when Hollywood execs come to Springfield as cast him as Fall-Out Boy for the Radioactive Man film. In a delightful subversion, the small town folk scam and cheat the honorable show business people until they have nothing left.

The goggles do nothing! Sometimes, only The Simpsons will do. First, let me say that nothing in this episode, absolutely nothing, comes close to being as funny as an annoyed Abe Simpson going "bitch, bitch, bitch. The setup of "toilet paper hung in improper overhand fashion," among other things, taking the kids away is really just an excuse to showcase the Flanders family, whose house has a "Pat Boone-ish" quality to it.

Long story short, Bart and Lisa hate it "They read Newsweek instead of nothing! Lisa decides to become a vegetarian despite Homer and the rest of the world trying to make her eat meat. Really well done, great detail in the animation of Willy as a giant bagpipe spider. This episode is super memorable to me because the 3rd dimension scenes were actually done with CGI. In an attempt to be allowed to work from home, Homer has to gain 61 pounds to be classified as disabled.

How is she still alive? What has she been the last 27 years? The Simpson family starts to question her and she tells the story of why she left Homer and Abe. Young Chief Wiggum is hilarious. Lisa finally finds a like-minded person in the family. This is one of the most beautiful and sad episodes of the series, ending with Homer being left by his mother once again, sitting on the hood of his car watching the stars.

By the 7th season we have pretty much seen Bob move away from killing Bart to at this point aiming to destroy lowbrow culture. Bob currently staying in Springfield penitentiary does his prison labor at a local air show where he hijacks a nuclear bomb and threatens to blow up the town unless they shut down all television stations. Very smart, very meta, and filled to the brim with classic moments I really want to see a show that involves a scorpion and a gasoline can.

Also "Sweet Enola Gay" is R. Lee Emery is hilarious as Col. If there was a fourth wall this episode broke it, sat down next to you on the couch and asked if it could change the channel. Filled with deleted scenes and outtakes the episode feels very much like a clip show, but rather a great tribute to itself.

From Troy McClure chain smoking while giving quizzes what a shame I thought Bleeding Gums Murphy had more fans to showing deleted scenes I do not understand how someone would not include a Robotic Richard Simmons in an episode.

There is episode is a fun mid season tribute to American favorite family. Though lets be honest here, you were all watching it for the hardcore nudity. This is the story of a mother failing to notice the warning signs her little boy is growing up and being shocked into it, despite his thirst for an excessively violent video game. Seeing her son steal on video throws everything she thinks she knows about Bart into question.

Young boys love their mothers enough to follow the Oedipus complex narrative, but the chasm between them grows nigh exponentially. Once upon a time, George H. Bush announced to the world that Americans should strive to be more like the Waltons, not the Simpsons. The creators had their satirical revenge when the 41st President arrives in Springfield. The episode is notable not only for its introduction of Disco Stu, but also for its more straightforward lampooning at the expense of the former president.

By season seven, the hit show was being lauded for its wit and relatable characters. While often oafish, Homer is ultimately just a big kid, but one who frequently displays the heartfelt desire to resolve any issues surrounding and frequently started by his family. The greatest gag of the episode might be the episode itself as Homer acts just as irresponsibly as he was once called out to be, and then in a slight break from character offers no reconciliation or apology for his behavior throughout the episode.

Rife with fast gags, and repeatedly inverting sitcom tropes surrounding compromise and learning-lessons, unlike much politically themed comedy this episode still merits laughs even eighteen years later. The most literary of the season, episode 14 reminds the audience that The Simpsons was a brilliant social satire. When their TV is broken, the Simpson family drives to Ogdenville to purchase another at a thrift shop. There, Marge reluctantly buys a designer suit because of its bargain price.

Delighted with it, she wears it everywhere, one day drawing the attention of a former high school classmate. The classmate invites Marge to the local Country Club for the day. The characters of Springfield as the audience has always known them are dependably unchanging, but the rich of Springfield are distinct in the way their fashions vary daily. Desperate to fit in, Marge begins to alter the suit she so loves so that it will look new and hopefully better each time, cutting pieces away every night — a useful metaphor for her own degraded principles.

But what in literature might have been a tragedy is saved by the humanity of her family when she finally realizes that she has altered herself enough, and they abandon the country club for a family dinner at Krusty Burger. Poignant social messages like the one in this episode are exactly what endeared audiences to The Simpsons, and it still works.

Once again, Bart messes with the life of Krusty the Clown. The great detective team of Bart and Lisa get the sneaking suspicion that Krusty faked his death and after they track down Rory B. Bellows, their suspicions are confirmed. The dynamic duo convince Krusty to comeback and with the life insurance policy of Rory B. Bellows, Krusty has the money to start over again. Hidden in his fife she discovers proof that Jebediah was in fact the murderous pirate "Hanz Sprungfeld. Lisa attempts to correct history but is thwarted by the towns hero worship.

In the end she sees that indeed, "A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man. This episode is ripe with the subtle jokes that define "the good seasons". It only leaves me with two questions: Not only do you learn about how helpless Mr. Burns causes him to snap and punch him. Hiding in fear, he learns to become self sufficient It's Itchy and Scratchy's 75th anniversary. Bart meets Chester J.

Lampwick who claims that he, not Roger Myers, created Itchy. After he shows the original film to Bart and Milhouse, it goes up in flames, leaving no proof of creation. They win when Bart gets an Itchy drawing from the comic book shop which is dated and reveals Chester did create Itchy.

The company goes bankrupt but is able to finance new cartoons after they sue the Post Office claiming their character was actually ripped off of Roger Meyer's actual creations.

Doppelgangers of Bart and Lisa helped cause this. Troy "You may know me from such films as" McClure is flirting with Selma and offers to take her to dinner in exchange for passing his eye test.

After being seen with a real woman his agent who hasn't called in 8 years calls and tells him work will come. Bart calls Lisa for help. Bart becomes a courier the world but not to Springfield. Lisa tells Homer but promises to keep the secret, orders equipment and has it delivered by courier so the boys hide in the crate. Among so much, Dr. The Bumblebee Man bit reaches its only logical conclusion. Nelson is ordered to wave to the people and blow them kisses by the greatest single-scene character this show ever created.

But the best of all comes when Skinner tells Chalmers no, he may not see Aurora Borealis localized entirely within his kitchen. The story is very appropriate in this day and age. The story straddles the fine line between preachy and commentary, and thankfully stays the course. Homerpalooza both reinforces that nostalgic notion with its storyline It's hard—and gut-wrenchingly painful—to become and stay cool and with its impressive lineup of cameos, like Cyprus Hill and Billy Corgan.

The story itself is rote—Homer puts himself in bodily harm to impress his kids—but the special guests are hilarious. This is an excellent Lisa-centric episode that deftly combines a relatable struggle of youth with golden-era moments of absurdity, cynicism, cartoony silliness, and laugh-out-loud humour grounded in well-developed characters.

This is, undoubtedly, one of the finest Treehouse of Horrors. Hibbert punching Hugo in the face; pigeon-rat , "The Genesis Tub" features simply brilliant animation the tiny aerial attack on Bart is legitimately cool , while "Citizen Kang" provides political commentary and canonical lines quoted ad nauseam during every US election since.

Yes, and so should you. Sometimes a great Simpsons episode needs nothing more than a simple premise and a perfect supporting cast member. You Only Move Twice is a flippant, wacky episode that revels in being part parody and part Simpsons misadventure.

Scorpio's manic energy and exuberant positivity takes over the episode as soon as he opens the door during a fun-run. Homer's dopey straight man plays perfectly against him, and the episode is as full of laughs as any that take place in Springfield. The Homer They Fall is another episode the takes a simple premise and looks to carry it with the weight of its guest characters. Paul Winfield's impression of Don King as Lucius Sweet is done well, but the character has less to work with.

While it has some funny gems, the episode can't quite keep the funny pace to hold up the somewhat flimsy premise. Rodney Dangerfield makes a guest appearance as Mr. Burns' long lost son, Larry. Burns shows Larry off to his fellow socialites, and ends up rejecting him because of his embarrassing behavior, ruining his reputation. The plot is simple, but it's paced well and full of great gags involving Homer's brain bailing on him, and the news televising tragic outcomes with their computer simulation.

It's also a vehicle for Dangerfield's one liners, which liberally pepper the script. Larry is the main character here, as the Simpsons aren't really involved much until the third act. Overall a very entertaining episode. This episode is a bit of a mixed bag. The first two acts have strong scenes; The kids terrorizing the neighborhood with an RC Plane, Homer showcasing his parenting ineptness, and of course Bart working at the burlesque house Grampa's and Skinner's reaction as they see Bart is hilarious.

The episode goes downhill when Marge leads a moral crusade to destroy the house, ending with Springfield becoming another angry mob not the first time The Simpsons go down that well. That crusade is thwarted with an entertaining musical number. Solid episode, though I think the third act is the weakest part. With shades of Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolfe, A Milhouse Divided chronicles the breaking up of the Van Houten family, and how each member of the blue-haired family as well as Homer and Marge deal with the divorce.

Luann thrives with her newfound freedom, Milhouse embraces the lack of attention and does as he pleases, and Kirk spirals into bad decision after bad decision.

The episode veers heavy into the dramatic; as a child of divorce, I see a lot of realism in the Van Houten's individual actions. Divorce is hard thing to deal with, and this episode proves it. We know this episode of The Simpsons is going to be good when Leonard Nimoy opens the episode, voicing himself. As we watch, we see constant reminders of what was popular in the 90s, for example, Milhouse playing an overpriced and highly ungratifying Kevin Costner arcade game and Homer referencing Speed though he calls it The Bus Couldn't Slow Down.

The writers enjoyed lambasting both alien encounter stories and the FBI in the majority of this episode. And, of course, it wouldn't be an episode of The Simpsons without a classic mocking of Fox. In this episode, Marge Simpson enters the cutthroat world of franchising. The flashy emptiness of business sales pitches makes us laugh when Marge is at the franchise expo.

The butt of the jokes in this episode is also the mafia, whom Home involves in Marge's business. It all works out in the end, though it takes an early morning mob fight to settle things one in which Homer misses "the good part" sadly. Mountain of Madness is definitely one of my favourite episodes. After a failed fire drill almost a blimp attack drill , Burns takes the power plant employees to the mountain for a teamwork retreat.

Hilarities ensue when Burns and Homer are teamed up and suffer cabin fever after an avalanche. The Simpsons hire a nanny, all of whom Homer is convinced are like Mrs. I kind of miss musical episodes.

Those famous lines from the Comic Book Guy originate in this episode and even though I don't believe this to be the worst simpsons episode ever, it will always be momorable to me. It's the first time I have seen a TV show make fun of itself within the show. Anything that happens with Poochie, happens to Roy. They eventually kill off Poochie, but I killed myself laughing when Roy moves in with "two sexy ladies". I Hope he's doing well. This is the first episode of a TV Show that I remember watching that has the word homosexual mentioned in it.

It was big deal for me, especially since I was only years old when I first seen this episode. It revolves around a new character named John and how he is a homosexual.

Homer loses his mind over it, and is trying to make sure he John doesn't turn Bart gay. The comedy in this episode isn't the greatest, but due to the nature of the topic, I understand why they couldn't go as far as they wanted to go with it.

The Sideshow Bob episode had become routine, and despite finding his way into the mayoral office and threatening Springfield with a nuclear explosion, they find a way to bring proper grandeur to this exercise.

Yale alum Bob notes that Cecil went to clown college: The setpiece of the Springfield dam at the climax is brilliant. Bob cuts an explosive to save the town from destruction while sacrificing himself. Bob would return four seasons later, when something about the series had gone a bit sour. But for now, Bob finished as a hero. When Ned has to run off to the Holy Land to rescue Maude from terrorists I love that this is never mentioned again, btw Lisa volunteers to babysit Rod and Todd.

Her moth handling abilities quickly make her the go-to babysitter in Springfield. Bart is furious at being babysat by his little sister and sets out to make her regret it. Patrick's Day mishap, a year old prohibition law is enforced in Springfield. The cause of and solution to, all of life's problems! When Edna and Seymour start up a slightly tawdry relationship, they use Bart as a go between.

After getting fed up, Bart outs the couple to the school. The blow back causes them to decide between each other or their jobs. Focusing on the Seymour and Edna, we get insight into two long time characters. This episode has a lot of heart and some solid jokes. It is well written and gives you hope for these two lonely people. Skinner does admit that he is a 44 year old virgin. Halper get their own credit card, with Bart buying a purebred perfectly trained collie named Laddie.

It was a bittersweet episode which included Bart giving up S. Bart also gives Laddie to Chief Wiggum, where he becomes a police dog. Eventually, Bart sets things right by breaking into Mr. Burns loses his entire fortune thanks to poor business decisions, he enlists Lisa to help him get it back.

This episode sees Lisa attempt to teach Mr. Burns the foreign concept of recycling, Mr. Former pro wrestler Bret Hart also makes a cameo. Burns is sent to the retirement home by grocery store clerks. Religion has always played in important role in the lives of the Simpsons. Although they moan and complain about church, they attend faithfully minus episodes such as "Homer the Heretic". Lovejoy's apathy shows that dealing with people's Flanders problems can grate on you after time.

It takes an incident with bloodthirsty baboons to help rejuvenate his will to be a shepherd to his flock. But come on, the real reason this episode is amazing is because of Mr. This episode is so great because it is all too relatable to all of us. At some time we may feel like we are Frank Grimes— slaving away while we are constantly getting shown up by the Homers of the world.

Bill Oakley, a longtime producer of the show, tweeted, "I think we all know someone like Frank Grimes who, although he is right, is just no fun to be around. Homer's incredible achievements understandably drive Grimey nuts until he kills himself. Everyone's love for Homer's inanity even overshadows Grimey's funeral. He just couldn't win. After Bart causes city-wide havoc by dixie-chaining megaphones during a fieldtrip to the police station, his parents conclude that he is lacking in discipline and decide to send him to military school.

In the end, Lisa pulls through and earns her second-grade medal and the support of her brother. Barney, forced to play designated driver for the gang at Moe's, ends up in NYC, where he abandons Homer's car.

Whether you love or hate NYC, there's something here for you: The Simpsons capture the absurdity of traveling to a brand new destination with loved ones. It might not be fun, it might not be truly exciting, but it's a shared experience that all look back upon fondly.

Armin Tamzarian meet Dick Whitman. What defines a man: Principal Seymour Skinner is revealed as an impostor and the town wrestles with the issue of identify long before Mad Men tackled the same issue. For over twenty years, Armin Tamzarian assumed Skinner's identity. Another walk down memory lane for the Simpsons clan as we find out the story behind how Lisa got her sax. While Bart struggles with his first days in kindergarten, Homer and Marge struggle to give Lisa the education they thinks she deserves.

During the episode Bart discovers the art of fart noises and his signature catch phrase "Eat My Shorts" much to the enjoyment of adorable little Milhouse , and Homer once again puts the happiness of his children first.

Homer checks out bomb shelters and while he's in one, France launched a nuclear attack on the US. Everyone turns into mutants except for the Simpsons, who were shielded by the lead in the paint of their house. After buying a teleportation device from Professor Frink's yard sale, Bart switches bodies with a fly.

The family adopts the fly thinking its' Bart until Lisa is able to reverse the situation. Colonial Mayor Quimby burns 3 witches at the stake. The town accuses Marge of being a witch. It turns out that she actually is a witch. Marge and her sisters scare people into giving them food, which is how Halloween started. Tackling the social issue of gun control, this episode covers a lot of ground with Homer's need to protect his family due to the riots started by the very boring soccer match between Mexico and Portugal.

With Homer's unique ability to cover the fears inappropriate motivations, questionable background check, use as an everyday tool and hopes constitutional right, stand up to a thief in a hold up of American's. The scene where Homer is trying to put the safety on the gun at the dinner table starts the real heart of the episode: What a great articulation of the father-son relationship through Springfield's children joining peewee football to help fight obesity.

With Homer ridiculing Flanders as a bad coach, he becomes the coach and takes favoring Bart to the extreme and quick downfall of the team. Through the miracle of Joe Namath's PSA of the dangers of vapor lock, cameo's from the King of the Hill characters, a prophetic Cat Fight arcade game for the reality shows to come, and Homer realizing the mistakes he was making with his relationship with Bart, he correctly lets Bart take the fall for Nelson's crimes.

One of the key things that The Simpsons gets right is a perfect balance between the realistic and the outlandish. Additionally there is more than enough craziness and trademark Simpsons humor to keep us from being bored, case in point the subplot story of Homer hiding out in the rest home with Grandpa Simpson, and loving every aspect of it.

There are only two Simpsons episodes I can actually remember watching when they were first aired: The promotional advertisements for this episode gave us brief glimpses of the angel that Lisa uncovers while on a school field trip, and enough soundbites and other teasers to get us interested anyone remember hearing a booming voice say "The End Will Come at Sundown…"?

Realty Bites is an episode of beginnings and ends. Beginnings include the introduction of the hapless employee Gil, and ends include the last appearance of Phil Hartman as Lionel Hutz.

Marge's various forays into employment are generally successful, but when it comes to the cutthroat world of real estate, Marge doesn't have the seemingly-necessary trait of being dishonest in order to succeed. Marge's morality is strong in this episode, and you feel sorry for her when everything comes crashing down—literally.

Homer's b-story of buying a hot rod is silly but ties the episode together cleverly in the end. Alas, All Singing All Dancing is a musical clip show, albeit with some new content. And while "singing is the lowest form of communication" thank you Homer for speaking for the audience , somehow the songs begin to weave their old magic into what would otherwise be a lazy clip show. You will find yourself first hating the songs, then tolerating them, then remembering how great they are, especially as the series progressed.

Burns "See My Vest! Homer and Bart head to the carnival Ding! After failing to bribe Chief Wiggum, the ring toss game is shut down and Homer invites Cooder and Spud to live in their house, only to have the carnies claim it as their own.

In a rare moment of genius, Homer cons them out of the house with a ring toss game of his own. I was sitting in my dark and empty apartment in the early morning hours. As I waited for my chance to review a cartoon I first watched in , it suddenly dawned on me just how meaningless my life truly was. Then I saw him: If anybody needs me, I can be reached at the Movementarian Compound where I will be working for the next 10 trillion years. This episode is overall pretty solid. That said, it clearly came at a point in the series where the relative realism of early episodes was increasingly done away with.

Still haven't eaten there. Krusty is confronted with how much he has sold out after bombing after a comedy festival hosted by Jay Leno and a bunch of other unnecessary celebrity cameos. At a press conference to announce his retirement, some of his sarcastic quips land with the audience and he immediately reinvents himself as a sarcastic Bill Hicks, Lewis Black, George Carlin type of comedian. This earns him credibility, which a couple of executives think will help him sell their new SUV.

Unsurprisingly this works, and we're treated to a fantastic commercial for the gigantic Canyonero SUV. Unexplained fires are a matter for the courts! Evidently Moe Szyzlak is unattractive and Homer decides to find him a girlfriend at someplace dark, Stu's Disco.

After being fooled by a Bacardi sales rep, Moe is dejected and decides to leave. Outside, a woman selling flowers finds him charming. They begin to date, but Moe quickly runs out of money. Distracted by "Hail to the Chimp," Homer messes up and ends up in jail.

Too happy with his relationship to admit his complicity, Moe decides to go to Hawaii with his girlfriend.

Confronted first by Homer's "ghost," and then a fugitive corporeal Homer, Moe's ends up burning to the ground. Fortunately, Barney was in the men's rooms and saves the kegs of beer and eventually Homer and Moe's unconscious bodies before rolling off the screen without his heroism ever acknowledged. We know what you did, though, Mr. This episode is a good representation of the season the Simpsons began its move from Great-to-good.

With a fairly contrived plot and limited laughs, re-watching this ep was like reliving the loss of an old friend. The opening segment is full of great lines. But from there it tails off like Ol' Gil's career. Don't get me wrong, it's still funny.

Just not the amazing work most of the previous 6 seasons had been. One thing the episode does well like classic Simpsons, however, is pay homage to movies and TV shows. From Lisa's recording a journal of her descent into stupidity a la "Flowers for Algernon" to the showing of the House of Usher falling, there are the high-brow references fans of the show have come to love.

But overall, the episode is pretty "meh. Krabapple's line to Ralph regarding his bloody bag attracting flies is one for the ages: I'll just give you a C-minus. What struck me first in this episode was the appearance of Troy McClure. I had to check to see if this was his swan song, but it turns out it's his second to last show. His line this time: I was also surprised to see so many low-brow jokes. Jokes about mooning, erections, sperm, and boogers make appearances, where in the past would have been jokes about Gore Vidal's sexuality.

Speaking of which, when playing hide-and-seek, Ralph was found "in the closet. But the best line from this is pretty obvious.

He told me to burn things. Homer is fired from the power plant after setting the whole place on fire in an effort to supersize a donut using the reactor. Burns that Homer has worked at the power plant for over ten years. The crew is stationed on a nuclear submarine.

Somehow, Homer finds himself in command of the submarine and sparks an international conflict by leading the submarine into Russian waters. In a rush to complete his taxes, Homer fills in a lot of inaccurate information such as Bart being a Vietnam War veteran and Maggie "being seven people. His primary mission is to find out what Mr. Burns did with a trillion-dollar bill he was supposed to deliver to Europe after WW2. Homer discovers that Mr. Burns kept the bill for himself due to his distaste for excessive government spending.

Realizing that he dislikes the government as well, Homer helps Mr. Burns flee to Cuba with the intention to buy the island using the bill. Their plans are ruined when Castro simply takes the money from Burns. The episode ends with Homer, Smithers, and Mr. Burns floating on a raft somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean.

In order to avoid the wrath of the FCC, a TV executive later known as Lindsey Neagle convinces Krusty to add ten minutes of educational content to his show. The resulting segment — "Kidz News" with Lisa — is a dud until Bart is named co-anchor. Despite a few inspired moments involving Homer and his helper monkey "Pray for Mojo" , the episode generally falls flat.

Lisa is too smug to root for and Bart is too sympathetic to loathe. Those seeking a "Broadcast News" parody should look elsewhere. He implements one bad idea after another, eventually forcing Mayor Quimby to move the entire town five miles down the road. While far terrible, the strung together plot and needless, albeit fun, U2 cameo drags this episode down.

It also won the Emmy for Outstanding Animated Program in King of writers, John Swartzwelder, uses his talents accordingly in this season nine episode. The plot is decidedly one of the weaker and more ridiculous in season nine.

The episode includes great visual gags of the increasingly higher peaks, the hilarious ingredients in Power Sauce bars apple cores and Chinese newspapers. It also contains one of the greatest dream sequences in the style of Land of Chocolate, which comically transitions into Homer sliding down the mountainside. In this season nine gem, we see a Lisa-centric episode, with an antic-riddled secondary story involving Bart gluing a series of facial fixtures literally!

The beauty of this episode lies with the persistent nature of Lisa, despite the obstacles in her way, and the relationship between Homer and Lisa.

In a show that features characters that never grow and change, casting a light on this very issue makes the story all the more average. This was a clunky way to start the tenth season. Homer, upon finding out that he has hit the midpoint of his life without accomplishing anything of note, sinks into depression. Poverty-plagued bully Nelson Muntz wins a pellet gun at a Family Fun Center, setting of a chain of events that ends with Bart accidentally shooting a mother bird.

The Simpsons family ends up caring for the orphan eggs, which hatch and reveal predatory Bolivian tree lizards. A high point of the season, the episode is unfortunately marred in tragedy as it is the final appearance of comedic genius Phil Hartman as Troy McClure, who you may remember from some of the best moments of The Simpsons ever.

This is one of my absolute favorite Treehouse of Horror episodes because it has a little bit of everyone in it; even Poochie makes a brief cameo.

The first story, about Homer receiving a haunted hair transplant has some classic Chief Wiggum moments. The third story about the family discovering Maggie is an alien has the classic alien pick-up line, "You look lovely this evening. Have you decreased in mass? Burns, he decides to shoot a recruitment commercial for new capable talent, leading Homer to join SAG. He finds out that he doesn't know what the J in his middle name stands for.

Homer and Grandpa go on a trip to the hippie commune Groovy Grove, where his mother used to hang out, to seek out his name. After the hippies kick out Homer, he takes matter into his own hands, harvesting and bottling a whole new set of juice The town hallucinates, including Grandpa and Jasper turning into Beavis and Butthead. Homer gets shot with a Daisy. The main plot involves Lisa cheating on a test. While the start of this plot really works, Lisa being enchanted by the magical pull of a video game and the aftermath of the cheating , once she reveals the truth to Skinner, it seems to fall apart.

Its no longer an episode about Lisa and her dealing with what she had done like in "Lisa's Rival" but rather Lisa vs Skinner, as he wants her to keep the cheating a secret so the school can receive grant money.

So in the end, when she finally admits to everyone that she did in fact cheat, the confession feels a bit hollow. The sub story of Homer and Pinchy the lobster seemed mostly pointless but tolerable. Homer, once the man trying to be a good father, is now the constant bumbling fool…but he is now a fool with a pet lobster. This episode, its type and era all represent "peak" Simpsons for me.

It swiftly skewers Titanic after the opening credits a year after its release , and introduces one of the more memorable Springfield pastimes with the Bi-Mon-Sci-Fi-Con.

Smart, subtle references to Battlestar Galactica, Dr. The title of this episode is in reference to the Elvis movie Viva Las Vegas. In this episode we learn that Ned is actually 60 years old and regretting that he has lead an uneventful life so he asks Homer to teach him how to be adventurous. Homer takes Ned to Las Vegas where Homer gets Ned so drunk they find out when they wake up the next morning that they married two cocktail waitresses.

When they try to escape the new wives they are caught by the Moody Blues and hotel security and thrown out of Nevada. Homer, Lenny, Carl and Barney get drunk after the Isotopes win the baseball championship and end up vandalizing Springfield elementary school. The next day the police blame the kids for the vandalism and enforce a curfew on the kids. To get even, the kids swipe some radio gear and broadcast the townspeople's deep secrets over the airwaves mostly about Homer.

When the adults find out where the kids are they bust them which leads to an argument that turns into a song. This wakes up and angers the elderly who end up passing a law to keep the adults inside.

Homer gets a chance to take a bunch of his friends from Springfield, and of course Bart, to the Super Bowl and he can't turn it down. In the contrasting B-Storyline, Marge and Lisa fight boredom by painting eggs. The fake ad involving the Catholic church is one of the standout gags here. Fortunately, FXX let it air uncut. Though the episode is fun, you can't accuse the story of having depth.

Clearly the episode was written with the purpose of filling the list of guest stars. A popular mid-season replacement TV show has an idiotic character named Homer Simpson, making Homer the laughingstock of Springfield. So he changes his name to Max Powers. This episode has it's share of classic Ho- Max Power quotes, but clearly this is one of many where the first two acts are much stronger than the third.

It's like the writers wanted the episode to go a certain place, but took too long to get there. But if you love Homer and his antics, there's plenty to laugh at here, even in the uneven third act. Apu neglects his family due to a hectic work schedule and then tries to make it up to his wife with a full week of grand romantic overtures, enraging the husbands of Springfield who now look like doofuses comparatively, on top of being doofuses objectively.

It's a promising setup, but could stand to spend more time on his ridiculous gifts, because otherwise everything proceeds exactly as you might imagine: Homer stumbling into a conciliatory gesture that accidentally appears heartfelt, followed by Marge squealing "oh, Homie!

How many times did they try to pull off this same ending? Who's the doofus now? For once, the high point of the episode belongs to the elder Wiggum rather than his son: I think she eventually saves the day by crashing the car into one of the rhinos or something, but I don't really remember because I wandered off looking for snacks.

This is one of the softer episodes of the series that really highlights Homer and Lisa's relationship. The episode places them in a pretty silly situation in sensory deprivation tanks a great jab at late '90s new age trends and harkens back to the episodes where Homer was a little more human and just wants to be a great dad. Overall, a solid outing by the Simpsons clan, especially for season A very middle-of-the-road episode.

It's by no means bad, but nothing makes it great. Homer takes on another career as a truck driver, this time with Bart, and we get to watch Marge and Lisa talk about a doorbell for fifteen minutes. This one is chock-full of references to '70s culture and it makes the whole episode feel a little retro. A totally unexceptional episode, but good enough to watch the rerun when it's on. This episode originally aired on the same night as the series premiere of Matt Groening's other series, Futurama.

It took four years of art school to fully understand the jokes, gags and bigger message of Mom and Pop Art. Homer unwittingly becomes an artist after a failed attempt to build a barbecue, but when art critics view his later works as uninspired, he takes a grander approach, turning Springfield into art itself. Modern art fans will appreciate Jasper Johns' cameo as a mooching klepto, and the general mockery of found artists as a whole.

In spite of all this, the episode drags on as Marge's jealousy over Homer's newfound artistic fame leads mostly nowhere. Art is, surprisingly, hard. Bart's racial stereotyping gets him into trouble. So, Bart must work at the Springfield Retirement Home. This part of the story alludes to 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' and Chief does cameo, but disappointingly only as another racial stereotype.. The episode starts out strong, but I don't think the main plot has any closure. It's just a return to normal.

Homer's subplot is enjoyable and I do like how it ties in with the main plot at the end. Here's my selfie that was retweeted by the official marathon account. The episode starts with some social commentary about the people adoring the rich due to small acts of philanthropy. Burns wants to achieve the same popularity. With Homer, they go on a PR campaign with several ideas that fail humorously in execution. After finding a huge monster in a shallow loch, they transport it via helicopter which I thought was unrealistic.

Overall, there are some funny one-liners in the episode and it ended in a silly, "Simpsons"-way. The episode begins like many other episodes of the Simpsons: It is pleasing to see that despite the episode aired in , is perfectly applicable to the reality of society today in which it gives an overwhelming importance to things that are not transcendent and ignore those that do. This is an episode where Lisa is the main character which results in a not so funny episode compared to others and the execution of it is not very solid either.

The subplot of Homer and the photo shoot is weak to say the least. Fortunately the brilliance of the writers of the Simpsons is reflected at the end of the episode with the inclusion of Stephen Hawking with some really funny dialogues that save the episode. In this episode the family travels to Tokyo in hopes of a memorable vacation, instead, Homer ruin the trip for everyone.

This episode takes place under the premise that the family was stripped of their savings for holidays and are forced to save the maximum in order to travel on vacation. The episode unfolds intelligently and naturally and as is common, episodes of family vacation work very well, with each of the members bringing their personality to the episode. Definitely a memorable episode although not the best and just behind a couple of episodes about vacation. In this episode, Homer lands himself a sweet gig as a food critic - however, he nearly gets his just deserts as he manages to anger every food purveyor in Springfield.

The chefs of the various cuisines of Springfield are played to their full stereotypes as they plot to give Homer his comeuppance - the Italian chef attacks him with a knife, the French chef is rude, the Japanese chef considers banning him from his restaurant too impolite and suggests killing him instead.

Could an eclair with 25 pounds of butter per square inch and over one million calories actually kill? Again, the three stories in the Treehouse of Horror episode follow no pattern. In the last clip, Homer destroys the Earth after not prepping the power plant for Y2K. Words cannot express the hilarity of watching Y2K-afflicted devices wreck the town - the fridge chucking ice cube! The traffic lights shooting lasers! The waffle iron biting!

The premise is simple: The story is interesting in its use of characters outside of the Simpson family, utilising them to recreate a traditional sitcom scenario: This extends to the whole Simpsons family. The ambitious balance of laughs with narrative means flaws exist, though are easily justified by a consistent stream of lol moments. The incongruent inclusion of The Simpson family in a lot of scenes can feel forced though. The conclusion of the episode, in keeping with its overall tone, is wacky, with the children sold to a zoo to perform in a variety show.

The episode finishes with a great pre-credit scene, though still feels loose overall. Homer wins a motorcycle, Bart teaches him to ride it in a brilliant scene, and Homer then forms a gang with Moe, Lenny, Karl, and Ned on a pushbike. The episode does start to fray with the introduction of a rival gang, who fall in love with Marge as a mother-figure.

Jokes featuring the gang can initially fall flat, though they eventually deliver quality laughs. Overall it could benefit from a more consistant pace, though still features some perfect laughs. Burns wins an award for being the oldest citizen in Springfield, he jets off to the Mayo Clinic to check in on his health, leaving the worst employee imaginable to take care of his house while gone.

The problem is that nothing actually happens in this episode. Burns goes away, is told he should be dead despite his feeling wonderful, comes back, and evicts Homer from his American dream fantasy. Considering that this was probably the first full Simpsons episode I've ever watched, I enjoyed it a lot. Homer brings home a horse and tries to find something to do with it, eventually settling on competitive horse racing.

Naturally, the horse loses its debut race, due to a combination of a lack of training and its nervousness. I'll leave the ending out, but suffice it to say Cake's classic "Going the Distance" is used.

Due to Homer's selfish behavior, Maude Flanders' wife ends up falling to her death. The second half shows Ned's attempts to grieve for his wife and get on with his life, mostly unsuccessfully. But when Ned turns back to god in the last few minutes, he finds peace and a new love interest.

This episode was great because it rewarded Ned for his faith in times of personal turmoil. A new crop of gambling addicts and resentful alcoholics. Airing between and , it was the best pre-Bush critical foreshadowing of the Iraq war on television. After Moe discovers — and reconciles — that he is ugly, the bartender decides to get plastic surgery to become a new, "better" man. Based on Pygmalion, the Greek sculptor who fell in love with a statue he carved of himself, the episode is a lesson in loving the person you are, not the person you see reflected.

Chalk full of less than subtle metaphors, it feels more like a PBS after school special than an episode of a sitcom. M35 Library West. As soon as the financial crisis erupted, the finger-pointing began.

On greedy traders, misguided regulators, sleazy subprime companies, cowardly legislators, or clueless home buyers? According to Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera, two of America's most acclaimed business journalists, the real answer is all of the above-and more. The full story is like the legend of the blind men and the elephant. Almost everyone has missed the big picture.

Almost no one has put all the pieces together. All the Devils Are Here goes back several decades to weave the hidden history of the financial crisis in a way no previous book has done. It explores the motivations of everyone from famous CEOs, cabinet secretaries, and politicians to anonymous lenders, borrowers, analysts, and Wall Street traders. It delves into the powerful American mythology of homeownership.

And it proves that the crisis ultimately wasn't about finance at all; it was about human nature. All You Can Pay: You don't care who can access your data because you have nothing to hide. But what if corporations were using that data to control your decisions? As millions of consumers carry on unaware, powerful corporations race to collect more and more data about our behaviors, needs, and desires. This massive trove of data represents one of the most valuable assets on the planet. Mongan show how companies use what they know about you to determine how much you are willing to pay for everything you buy.

From college tuition to plane tickets to groceries to medicine, companies already set varying prices based on intimate knowledge of individual wants and purchasing power. As the consumer age fades into history, rapidly changing prices and complex offers tailored to each individual are spreading like a fog over the free market.

Data giants know everything about us before we enter stores or open our browsers. We may think that the Internet lets us find the best deals, but the extensive information companies have about us means that the price we see tends toward the maximum they know we can pay. In a momentous shift, the economics of information will turn our economy on its head. Fair bargaining is over. Hacker; Paul Pierson Call Number: H33 Library West, On Order. Hacker and Paul Pierson explained how political elites have enabled and propelled plutocracy.

Like every other prospering democracy, the United States developed a mixed economy that channeled the spirit of capitalism into strong growth and healthy social development. In this bargain, government and business were as much partners as rivals.

Public investments in education, science, transportation, and technology laid the foundation for broadly based prosperity. Programs of economic security and progressive taxation provided a floor of protection and business focused on the pursuit of profit—and government addressed needs business could not. The mixed economy was the most important social innovation of the twentieth century.

It spread a previously unimaginable level of broad prosperity. It enabled steep increases in education, health, longevity, and economic security. And yet, extraordinarily, it is anathema to many current economic and political elites. And as the advocates of anti-government free market fundamentalist have gained power, they are hell-bent on scrapping the instrument of nearly a century of unprecedented economic and social progress. In American Amnesia, Hacker and Pierson explain how—and why they must be stopped.

In this tale of grit and glamour, setbacks and comebacks, business and pop culture icon Tommy Hilfiger shares his extraordinary life story for the first time. Few designers have stayed on top of changing trends the way Tommy Hilfiger has.

Fewer still have left such an indelible mark on global culture. Since designing his first collection of "classics with a twist" three decades ago, Tommy Hilfiger has been synonymous with all-American style--but his destiny wasn't always so clear. Growing up one of nine children in a working-class family in Elmira, New York, Tommy suffered from dyslexia, flunked sophomore year of high school, and found himself constantly at odds with his father.

Nevertheless, this self-described dreamer had a vision and the relentless will to make it a reality. At eighteen he opened his own clothing store, parlaying his uncanny instinct for style into a budding career as a fashion designer.

Through decades of triumph and turmoil, Tommy remained doggedly optimistic. To this day, his approach to commerce is rooted in his positive view of the world. American Dreamer brims with anecdotes that cover Tommy's years as a club kid and scrappy entrepreneur in s New York as well as unique insights into the exclusive A-list personalities with whom he's collaborated and interacted, from Mick Jagger and David Bowie to Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein.

But this is more than just a fashion icon's memoir--it's a road map for building a brand, both professionally and personally. Tommy takes us behind the scenes of every decision--and every mistake--he's ever made, offering advice on leadership, business, team-building, and creativity.

This is the story of a true American original, told for the first time in his own words, with honesty, humor, and the insatiable appetite for life and style that proves that sometimes you have to dream big to make it big. Since then, year after year he has been ahead of the curve with his elegant and stylish looks. His creative energy has always been an inspiration to me. He's really himself in American Dreamer.

In American Dreamer Tommy shows how he has taken the rock stars and the preppy stripes and come up with a look--and a label--that are recognized globally as being quintessentially American, as well as a brand that constantly keeps time with pop music. American Dreamer shows how he has managed to be successful in business and done so with integrity. I have come to know Tommy, and every time we talk I learn something new about creating a successful business.

In American Dreamer you can feel his passion pour through everything he does: American Dreamer documents how, unlike any other designer, Tommy was able to tap into music, its subculture, and its influence on society, which propelled his fashion to be mainstream and global.

Franz Contribution by Call Number: A44 Library West, Forthcoming Order. What does it mean to be an American? What are American ideas and values? American Enterprise, the companion book to a major exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, aims to answer these questions about the American experience through an exploration of its economic and commercial history. It argues that by looking at the intersection of capitalism and democracy, we can see where we as a nation have come from and where we might be going in the future.

Richly illustrated with images of objects from the museum's collections, American Enterprise includes an early Thomas Edison light bulb, a wheat thresher, a Barbie doll, a Google server, and many other goods and services that have shaped American culture. Historical and contemporary advertisements are also featured, emphasizing the evolution of the relationship between producers and consumers over time. Interspersed in the historical narrative are essays from today's industry leaders-including Sheila Bair, Adam Davidson, Bill Ford, Sally Greenberg, Fisk Johnson, Hank Paulson, Richard Trumka, and Pat Woertz-that pose provocative questions about the state of contemporary American business and society.

American Enterprise is a multi-faceted survey of the nation's business heritage and corresponding social effects that is fundamental to an understanding of the lives of the American people, the history of the United States, and the nation's role in global affairs. L49 Library West, On Order. Americans today face no shortage of threats to their financial well-being, such as job and retirement insecurity, health care costs, and spiraling college tuition.

By their nature, the very arguments intended to mobilize individuals—asking them to devote money or time to politics—remind citizens of their economic fears and personal constraints, leading to undermobilization and nonparticipation. Adam Seth Levine explains why the set of people who become politically active on financial insecurity issues is therefore quite narrow.

When money is needed, only those who care about the issues but are not personally affected become involved. When time is needed, participation is limited to those not personally affected or those who are personally affected but outside of the labor force with time to spare.

The latter explains why it is relatively easy to mobilize retirees on topics that reflect personal financial concerns, such as Social Security and Medicare. In general, however, when political representation requires a large group to make their case, economic insecurity threats are uniquely disadvantaged.

Scrutinizing the foundations of political behavior, American Insecurity offers a new perspective on collective participation. The American Mortgage System: Crisis and Reform by by Susan M. Wachter and Marvin M. U5 A Library West. Successful home ownership requires the availability of appropriate mortgage products.

In the years leading up to the collapse of the housing market, home buyers frequently accepted mortgages that were not only wrong for them but catastrophic for the economy as a whole.

When the housing market bubble burst, so did a cornerstone of the American dream for many families. Restoring the promise of this dream requires an unflinching inspection of lending institutions and the right tools to repair the structures that support solid home purchases.

Crisis and Reform focuses on the causes of the housing market collapse and proposes solutions to prevent another rash of foreclosures. It examines key elements of the mortgage meltdown and the influence of the Community Reinvestment Act, which is often blamed for the crisis. They uncover how the government-sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac invested outside the housing market with disastrous results. The American Mortgage System offers solutions to the problems. This book is a sound investment for economists, urban planners, and all who shape public policy.

G Library West. Once an icon of American industry, railroads fell into a long decline beginning around the turn of the twentieth century. Overburdened with regulation and often displaced by barge traffic on government-maintained waterways, trucking on interstate highways, and jet aviation, railroads measured their misfortune in lost market share, abandoned track, bankruptcies, and unemployment.

Today, however, as Robert Gallamore and John Meyer demonstrate, rail transportation is reviving, rescued by new sources of traffic and advanced technology, as well as less onerous bureaucracy.

In , Congress responded to the industry's plight by consolidating most passenger rail service nationwide into Amtrak. But private-sector freight service was left to succeed or fail on its own. The renaissance in freight traffic began in with the Staggers Rail Act, which allowed railroad companies to contract with customers for services and granted freedom to set most rates based on market supply and demand.

Railroads found new business hauling low-sulfur coal and grain long distances in redesigned freight cars, while double-stacked container cars moved a growing volume of both international and domestic goods. Today, trains have smaller crews, operate over better track, and are longer and heavier than ever before. Near the end of the twentieth century, after several difficult but important mergers, privately owned railroads increased their investments in safe, energy-efficient, environmentally friendly freight transportation.

American Railroads tells a riveting story about how this crucial U. America's Assembly Line by David E. N Library West. The assembly line was invented in and has been in continuous operation ever since. It is the most familiar form of mass production. Both praised as a boon to workers and condemned for exploiting them. In America's Assembly Line, David Nye examines the industrial innovation that made the United States productive and wealthy in the twentieth century.

The assembly line -- developed at the Ford Motor Company in for the mass production of Model Ts -- first created and then served an expanding mass market. It inspired fiction, paintings, photographs, comedy, cafeteria layouts, andcookie-cutter suburban housing. It also transformed industrial labor and provoked strikes and uniondrives. By , Japan had reinvented the assembly line as a system of "leanmanufacturing"; American industry reluctantly adopted this new approach.

Nye describes thisevolution and the new global landscape of increasingly automated factories, with fewer industrialjobs in America and questionable working conditions in developing countries. A century after Ford'spioneering innovation, the assembly line continues to evolve toward more sustainablemanufacturing. Library West, On Order.

The tumultuous era and remarkable personalities that unexpectedly birthed the Federal Reserve, from renowned financial writer Roger Lowenstein Until the election of Woodrow Wilson the United States—alone among developed nations—lacked a central bank. However, in the aftermath of a disastrous financial panic, Congress was persuaded—by a confluence of populist unrest, widespread mistrust of bankers, ideological divisions, and secretive lobbying—to approve the landmark Federal Reserve Act.

Writing in a rich and untapped historical vein, Roger Lowenstein—acclaimed financial journalist and bestselling author of When Genius Failed and The End of Wall Street—reveals the drama-filled, unlikely story of how America created the Federal Reserve, thereby taking its first steps onto the world stage as a global financial power. Aldrich, the reigning power broker in the U. Weaving a slice of American politics together with a storied financial collapse and intrigue at the highest levels of Washington and Wall Street, Lowenstein delivers a gripping historical narrative.

C3 N37 Library West. The definitive life of Andrew Carnegie-one of American business's most iconic and elusive titans-by the bestselling author of Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. Celebrated historian David Nasaw, brings new life to the story of one of America's most famous and successful businessmen and philanthropistsin what will prove to be the biography of the season.

With a trove of new material--unpublished chapters of Carnegie's Autobiography; personal letters between Carnegie and his future wife, Louise, and other family members; his prenuptial agreement; diaries of family and close friends; his applications for citizenship; his extensive correspondence with Henry Clay Frick; and dozens of private letters to and from presidents Grant, Cleveland, McKinley, Roosevelt, and British prime ministers Gladstone and Balfour, as well as friends Herbert Spencer, Matthew Arnold, and Mark Twain--Nasaw brilliantly plumbs the core of this facinating and complex man, deftly placing his life in cultural and political context as only a master storyteller can.

Akerlof and Robert J. P8 A Library West. The global financial crisis has made it painfully clear that powerful psychological forces are imperiling the wealth of nations today. From blind faith in ever-rising housing prices to plummeting confidence in capital markets, "animal spirits" are driving financial events worldwide.

George Akerlof and Robert Shiller challenge the economic wisdom that got us into this mess, and put forward a bold new vision that will transform economics and restore prosperity. They reassert the necessity of an active government role in economic policymaking by recovering the idea of animal spirits, a term John Maynard Keynes used to describe the gloom and despondence that led to the Great Depression and the changing psychology that accompanied recovery.

Like Keynes, Akerlof and Shiller know that managing these animal spirits requires the steady hand of government. They detail the most pervasive effects of animal spirits in contemporary economic life and show how Reaganomics, Thatcherism, and the rational expectations revolution failed to account for them.

Animal Spiritsoffers a road map for reversing the financial misfortunes besetting us today. Read it and learn how leaders can channel animal spirits--the powerful forces of human psychology that are afoot in the world economy today.

T Library West. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world.

Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, and turmoil. In Antifragile,Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better. The antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events.

How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives? The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems, and medicine. In addition to the street wisdom of Fat Tony of Brooklyn, the voices and recipes of ancient wisdom, from Roman, Greek, Semitic, and medieval sources, are loud and clear. Antifragileis a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world. M Library West, On Order. Dubai's Burj Khalifa--the world's tallest building--looks nothing like Microsoft's Office Suite, and digital surround sound doesn't work like a citywide telecommunication grid.

Yet these engineering feats have much in common. Applied Minds explores the unique visions and mental tools of engineers to reveal the enormous--and often understated--influence they wield in transforming problems into opportunities.

An engineer himself, Guru Madhavan introduces a flexible intellectual tool kit called modular systems thinking as he explains the discipline's penchant for seeing structure where there is none. The creations that result from this process express the engineer's answers to the fundamental questions of design: Through narratives and case studies spanning the brilliant history of engineering, Madhavan shows how the concepts of prototyping, efficiency, reliability, standards, optimization, and feedback are put to use in fields as diverse as transportation, retail, health care, and entertainment.

Equal parts personal, practical, and profound, Applied Minds charts a path to a future where we apply strategies borrowed from engineering to create useful and inspired solutions to our most pressing challenges.

In this book, Simon Bowmaker offers a remarkable collection of conversations with leading economists about research in economics. He has selected a broad sample of the great economists of our time, including people whose perspectives span most of the major subdivisions of economics research, from micro to macro, from theoretical to empirical, from rationalist to behavioralist. This innovative volume contains 25 interviews with practicing economists, presenting insightful personal accounts into an often-misunderstood field.

Contributors to this volume were asked to reflect on their own experience in economics research, including their methods of working, the process of scientific discovery and knowledge creation, and the challenges of successfully disseminating their work.

The unique and compelling interview format showcases each contributor's personal connection to his or her work, presenting a view of current economics research that is technical, comprehensive, and refreshingly human. Both students and current scholars in economics will find much to admire in this book's window into the inner workings of some of the brightest and best-known minds in the field. I94 Library West. Whether mundane or life-altering, these choices define us and shape our lives. Sheena Iyengar asks the difficult questions about how and why we choose: Is the desire for choice innate or bound by culture?

Why do we sometimes choose against our best interests? How much control do we really have over what we choose? Sheena Iyengar's award-winning research reveals that the answers are surprising and profound. In our world of shifting political and cultural forces, technological revolution, and interconnected commerce, our decisions have far-reaching consequences.

C45 L45 e-book MyiLibrary. Your guide to becoming an explanation specialist. You've done the hard work. Your product or service works beautifully - but something is missing. People just don't see the big idea - and it's keeping you from being successful. Your idea has an explanation problem. The Art of Explanation is for business people, educators and influencers who want to improve their explanation skills and start solving explanation problems.

Author Lee LeFever is the founder of Common Craft, a company known around the world for making complex ideas easy to understand through short animated videos. He is your guide to helping audiences fall in love with your ideas, products or services through better explanations in any medium.

You will learn to: Learn explanation basics, what causes them to fail and how to diagnose explanation problems. Using simple elements, create an explanation strategy that builds confidence and motivates your audience.

Produce remarkable explanations with visuals and media. The Art of Explanation is your invitation to become an explanation specialist and see why explanation is now a fundamental skill for professionals. The Art of Negotiation: W49 Library West.

A member of the world-renowned Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School introduces the powerful next-generation approach to negotiation.

For many years, two approaches to negotiation have prevailed: Michael Wheeler provides a dynamic alternative to one-size-fits-all strategies that don't match real world realities. The Art of Negotiation shows how master negotiators thrive in the face of chaos and uncertainty. They understand negotiation as a process of exploration that demands ongoing learning, adapting, and influencing. Their agility enables them to reach agreement when others would be stalemated.

Michael Wheeler illuminates the improvisational nature of negotiation, drawing on his own research and his work with Program on Negotiation colleagues.

He explains how the best practices of diplomats such as George J. Mitchell, dealmaker Bruce Wasserstein, and Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub apply to everyday transactions like selling a house, buying a car, or landing a new contract. Wheeler also draws lessons on agility and creativity from fields like jazz, sports, theater, and even military science. The Art of Strategy: D Library West. Game theory means rigorous strategic thinking. Though parts of game theory involve simple common sense, much is counterintuitive, and it can only be mastered by developing a new way of seeing the world.

Using a diverse array of rich case studies—from pop culture, TV, movies, sports, politics, and history—the authors show how nearly every business and personal interaction has a game-theory component to it.

Mastering game theory will make you more successful in business and life, and this lively book is the key to that mastery. The Ascent of Money: F47 Library West. Niall Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of finance, from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest upheavals.

To Christians, love of it is the root of all evil. To generals, it's the sinews of war. To revolutionaries, it's the chains of labor. But historian Ferguson shows that finance is in fact the foundation of human progress.

What's more, he reveals financial history as the essential backstory behind all history. Through Ferguson's expert lens, for example, the civilization of the Renaissance looks very different: The rise of the Dutch republic is reinterpreted as the triumph of the world's first modern bond market over insolvent Habsburg absolutism.

Yet the central lesson of financial history is that, sooner or later, every bubble bursts. If you think those are the things to focus on in building an investment portfolio, Andrew Ang has accumulated a body of research that will prove otherwise. In his new book Asset Management: A Systematic Approach to Factor Investing, Ang upends the conventional wisdom about asset allocation by showing that what matters aren't asset class labels but the bundles of overlapping risks they represent.

Making investments is like eating a healthy diet, Angsays: Failing to do so can lead to a serious case of malnutrition - for investors as well as diners. The key, in Ang's view, is bad times, and the fact that every investor's bad times are somewhat different.

The notion that bad times are paramount is the guiding principle of the book, which offers a new approach to the age-old problem of where do you put your money? Years of experience, both as afinance professor and as a consultant, have led Ang to see that the traditional approach, with its focus on asset classes, is too crude and ultimately too costly to serve investors adequately.

He focuses instead on "factor risks," the peculiar sets of hard times that cut across asset classes, andthat must be the focus of our attention if we are to weather market turmoil and receive the rewards that come with doing so. Optimally harvesting factor premiums - on our own or by hiring others -r equires identifying your particular set of hard times, and exploiting the difference between them andthose of the average investor.

Clearly written yet chock-full of the latest research and data, Asset Management will be indispensable reading for trustees, professional money managers, smart private investors, and business students who want to understand the economics behind factor risk premiums, harvest them efficiently in theirportfolios, and embark on the search for true alpha. Economists make confident assertions in op-ed columns and on cable news-so why are their explanations often at odds with equally confident assertions from other economists?

And why are all economic predictions so rarely borne out? Harnessing his frustration with these contradictions, Jonathan Schlefer set out to investigate how economists arrive at their opinions.

While economists cloak their views in the aura of science, what they actually do is make assumptions about the world, use those assumptions to build imaginary economies known as models , and from those models generate conclusions.

Schlefer takes up current controversies such as income inequality and the financial crisis, for which he holds economists in large part accountable.

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